Defeater’s Self Titled Return is Brutal Yet Heartbreaking

Defeater is a riveting story of struggle which packs a punch of brutal instrumentation and heartfelt lyricism.

Defeater is a melodic hardcore band from Boston. They debuted in 2008 with Travels which tells the story of a young man born in New Jersey near the end of the second world war. This family and the circumstances surrounding them would go on to be the focus of the entirety of Defeater’s discography with each album expanding the world and introducing a litany of new characters, some acting as sequels and others as prequels. In addition to the sprawling narrative, the band’s unique ability to mix hardcore instrumentation with a keen sense of melody makes them one of the most interesting bands in the modern metal scene. They officially parted ways after the 2015 release of Abandoned, but announced in early March that they would return with a self-titled fifth LP.

From the opening track, “The Worst of Fates,” the most prevalent highlight of the band’s sound is clear, that being Derek Archambault’s vocal performance. Throughout the album, especially on cuts like the aforementioned opener or the more subtle “Desperate,” Archambault brings an intensity that can’t be ignored. Under that roughness, however, there’s a genuine vulnerability through which he imbues every story and character with a gruff sort of humanity. It’s a brutal scream, but heartfelt all the same.

Beyond this, Archambault’s lyrics are once again enthralling. Of course, the story telling and conceptualism of the album is every bit as excellent as expected. On tracks like “List & Heel,” or “All Roads,” though, he goes above and beyond in painting vivid imagery and writing with a truly cinematic eye. Along with its many other functions, this album is the fifth installment to a long series which deals with the same family and, in that department, it succeeds wildly.

Instrumentally, the record is a masterwork. Perhaps the most noticeable piece of the puzzle is Joe Longobardi’s drum work. On cuts like “Mother’s Sons,” or “No Guilt,” Joe transitions between complex rhythms and lightning quick fills and does each incredibly well. He has an excellent ear for timing and despite rather predictable time signatures and somewhat weak production, his work shines through as a definitive key to the band’s impressive sound.

Another great element is Jake Woodruff’s grinding lead guitar. While a few of choices are a bit questionable, his contributions to tracks like “Stale Smoke,” and my favorite song on the album, “Debt/Debtor,” can’t be ignored. His drowning style provides a more solid counterpoint against some of the album’s most driving, fast paced beats and he has a talent for writing hooks. On a few cuts, his leads provide the catchiest moments on the album in addition to laying a more layered atmosphere.

My favorite aspect of the band’s sound, though it may not be as immediately noticeable, is founding member Mike Poulin on bass guitar. He grants a heaviness to songs like “Atheists in Foxholes,” and “Hourglass,” and he’s to thank for much of Defeater’s fantastic sound. The chugging, rhythmic bass stands as the foundation of nearly every melody and it is, in many ways, the glue that holds the album together.

As if all this wasn’t enough, Defeater combines all of this for an epic, creative finish in “No Man Born Evil.” This track embodies much of what makes this album so good with a ringing lead guitar, thundering bass, and explosive drums underscoring an unbelievable performance from Derek Archambault which brings to life a harrowing storyline. It’s the perfect ending to a nearly perfect album.

Defeater’s self-titled come back is almost everything fans could’ve hoped for. We get to return to the dark, gritty world which they’ve created over the past decade, guiding by great writing and wonderful performances from the entire band.

Defeater is a riveting story of struggle which packs a punch of brutal instrumentation and heartfelt lyricism.

8/10

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Tool Sells Out the Enterprise Center For An Incredible Performance

Tool is still one of the best rock bands in the world, without a doubt, and this tour has only further codified their place in rock history.

Tool is an alt-rock/prog-metal four piece who rose to popularity in the early 1990’s thanks to their unique sound, bizarre live performances, and a fantastic debut EP called Opiate which came out in 1992. At this time, their sound was heavy, often droning, and far more melodic than the majority of the underground metal in the early nineties. As they progressed, and thanks to the additions of Peach bassist Justin Chancellor and King Crimson producer David Bottrill, Tool took on a more experimental and cutting edge tone which led to massive success and critical acclaim which has continued to this day.

I’ve seen Tool three times, and this was by far the best of the bunch. My first experience came in 2016 at the Chaifetz arena in Saint Louis. It was a smaller tour and Chaifetz is a smaller arena, but the show was fantastic and seeing one of my favorite bands for the first time was a blast. The second came as the headliner and final performance at 2018’s Rock on the Range festival where Tool, though not on tour at the time, brought the house down musically but didn’t quite have the stage set up one would expect from the group. Last night, I saw them for the first time in their peak form, in front of a sold out crowd of about 18,000 roaring fans at the Enterprise Center in St. Louis.

Of course, a giant question looms over any review of a Tool concert in 2019, and so I’ll answer it immediately. Yes, they played new music and it was fantastic. Coming into the show, I’d heard a few shoddy cellphone videos of new tracks like “Descending,” and “Invincible,” but I found myself shocked at the extent to which those videos don’t do these songs justice. The former was brutally heavy, featuring a few of the thickest breakdowns in Tool’s catalog and the latter has an interestingly bright tone and some of the best drum work of Danny Carey’s career. As the intermission before the encore came to an end, the screen went blank and lit back up the word’s “August 30th” written in white, referring to the release date for Tool’s first new LP in 13 years, and having heard these new songs in person, I found myself filled with a brand new excitement like I’ve never felt for an album before.

Beyond new music, all four members of the band gave simply incredible performances on a litany of Tool’s best hits over their long career. They opened with “Aenima,” which was a perfectly heavy way to kick off the show. Maynard’s cleaner vocal sounded excellent on tracks like “The Pot,” and his screams were gravelly and powerful. Adam Jones’ guitar work on songs like “Jambi,” was thick and impressively fast-handed.

The stars of the night, however, were certainly the drums and bass. Justin Chancellor’s bass line on “Schism,” was as excellent as ever, and throughout the show, he was an absolute ball of energy, swinging his hips like an ape and playing with a deep, rich tone that seemed to shake the walls of the entire arena.

Just behind him, Danny Carey helmed a massive drum kit and proved once again that he is one of the best drummers of all time. From his complex rhythms on “Forty Six & 2” to his explosive playing on “Vicarious,” and “Intolerance,” his playing commanded respect and attention for the entirety of the show. The encore began with an extended drum and synth solo from Danny, alone on stage, which was an extremely welcome break in the action to appreciate one of the most talented musicians to ever pick up a set of sticks.

Highlights of the show included a sprawling, expansive performance of “Parabol/Parabola,” early in the set and the ferocious performance of “Stinkfist,” to close the show. These were made that much better by an awe-inspiring light show which included an array of lasers, a lighted, colorful pentagram which moved about in the background, and a multitude of entrancing videos on cranes behind the band, most of which consisted of Tool’s infamously strange music videos.

All in all, this was one of the best live performances I’ve ever seen. Nearly 30 years after their debut, to see Tool returning to form in front of a sold out arena is an exhilarating experience. It’s hard to believe that we’re only about three months away from finally hearing the new album and this show left me more excited than ever.

Tool is still one of the best rock bands in the world, without a doubt, and this tour has only further codified their place in rock history.

Clinic Returns to Form With Entrancing Eighth LP

Wheeltappers and Shunters is a perfectly crafted piece of psychedelic punk with a surprise waiting around every corner.

Clinic is a psychedelic post-punk band from Liverpool, England. They began under the moniker of Pure Morning, releasing Two Inch Helium Buddah in 1996 before debuting as Clinic with 2000’s Internal Wrangler. The record found some underground success and netted the band a spot as an opener on tour with Radiohead. They remained prolific throughout the 2000’s with seven full albums and two EPs in 12 years which led to a multitude of festival performances as well as another supporting tour, this time alongside indie darlings, Arcade Fire. After 2012’s Free Reign however, the band announced a sabbatical which wouldn’t end until they returned to the stage four years later with John Cale at a tribute show for The Velvet Underground. Now, seven years after their last release, Clinic is finally back with Wheeltappers and Shunters.

Instrumentally, the album is just as impressive as ever. Brian Campbell’s bass guitar sounds fantastic holding down the rhythms of cuts like the opener, “Laughing Cavalier,” or the closer, “New Equations.” His tone is thick and the melodic lines which he discovers function perfectly as the foundation for the unique and head-spinning sound which Clinic is able to achieve.

On top of this, Ade Blackburn does great work as a frontman, bringing each song to life with a set of spellbinding performances which vary greatly from track to track. On “Ferryboat of the Mind,” he’s cold, distant, and almost omnipresent. In “D.I.S.C.I.P.L.E,” on the other hand, Blackburn brings an unnerving energy and excitement which feels almost alien when filtered through his strange sound. He’s incredibly dynamic, and his work is a large part of the album’s success.

Of course, the performance is made all the better by the jarring, poetic lyricism on nearly every cut. “Mirage,” uses repetition and leans heavily into the band’s more punk roots while “Flying Fish,” takes advantage of a relatively simple rhyme scheme to achieve a more singable feel. Different still, “Congratulations,” strings together a multitude of evocative but borderline meaningless phrases to inspire an attitude more so than tell a story. The lyrics, while often difficult to grasp in a literal sense, go a long way toward crafting the alienated aesthetic that makes this record stand out.

All of this is helmed by near perfect production. All of the producing work was done by the band themselves and that entangling of the creating and polishing process bleeds through every second. From the swirling whispers of “Complex,” to the raucous cacophony of “Rubber Bullets,” this LP consistently builds bewildering waves of sound which are then split in half by striking melodies.

The clear highlight of the album, however, is the absolutely engulfing atmosphere which is created by a combination of all these elements. The most obvious example of this is certainly the bizarre and unpredictable interlude, “Tigers,” but it’s also present in tracks like “Rejoice,” and my favorite cut on the album, “Be Yourself/Year of the Sadist.” The music creates a visual almost instantly, and it makes the album as a whole into a unique experience.

All in all, this record is fantastic. Nearly every aspect, from the songwriting to the performances and through the production, is perfectly executed, resulting in a record that warrants multiple listens. Beyond this, a wide instrumental pallet, strong lead guitar work, and perfect pacing makes the LP just that much more listenable.

Wheeltappers and Shunters is a perfectly crafted piece of psychedelic punk with a surprise waiting around every corner.

8/10

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Architects and Company Bring Rocking Tour to East Saint Louis

Friday night, Architects brought the massive Holy Hell tour to Pop’s in East Saint Louis for a blaring loud night or rock music.

Architects is a metalcore five piece from Brighten, England. They debuted all the way back in 2006 but with their most recent run of albums beginning with 2014’s Lost Forever/Lost Together, they’ve found increasing international success. Their latest LP, Holy Hell released last year at broke the top 100 on the US Billboard chart and spawned a large scale international tour. Their sound mixes the heavier elements of metalcore with fairly melodic choruses, seamlessly transitioning from thundering breakdowns to singable hooks and back again. Friday night, Architects brought the massive Holy Hell tour to Pop’s in East Saint Louis for a blaring loud night or rock music.

While She Sleeps kicked off the show with quite an impressive half-hour set. The relatively accomplished British metalcore group brought an almost unrelenting heaviness to their entire performance and frontman Lawrence Taylor was able to bring the energy within the venue to a fever pitch. All of this was accomplished, notwithstanding quite a few setbacks. Of course, it’s never easy to be the opening act and the crowd was still filtering in at the beginning of the set and beyond this, they were also confined to only about a third of stage thanks to the gear of the following acts. Regardless, While She Sleeps gave quite a performance and set a very high bar.

Up next came Thy Art is Murder, the Australian deathcore band who were quite a bit heavier than either of the other groups sharing the bill. With this reputation already well known, the group absolutely brought the power from their first track. Lead vocalist, Chris McMahon took the stage in a hooded cloak which, along with his long beard and hair and growling voice made for a horrifying, yet entertaining opening. The tracks, admittedly, bled together a bit, but the crowd was electric by this point and thanks to some incredible rhythms from new drummer Jesse Beahler and some fantastic guitar solos from Andy Marsh. Thy Art is Murder played for about an hour and by the time they closed, my ears were ringing and the crowd was more than ready for the headliner.

Architects took the stage at about half past nine to roaring applause and brought even more energy to the stage. Along with the band came an incredible lighting rig which was perfectly programmed. The strobing flood lights and multitude of colors were genuinely mesmerizing and, though I don’t often comment on lighting all that much as its outside my area of expertise, this rig was one of the best I’ve seen in such a small venue.

On top of the staging, the group was extremely impressive musically. Their choruses were melodic and encouraged quite a bit crowd singalongs, and their breakdowns were absolutely brutal. The mix was quite bass heavy throughout all three sets and along with the lighting, this made for a scene that neared sensory overload quite often. Drummer Dan Searle played explosively on a massive kit and frontman Sam Carter’s ability to switch between clean vocals and barbarous screams helps smooth the transitions between their two sounds.

Above all, the highlight of the night was certainly the crowd. For the final two acts, Pop’s was absolutely packed with raucous fans who formed a downright dangerous pit which never seemed to stop growing. Aside from a few stray fights which broke out in the back, the pit was fairly considerate but massive and quite physical.

As the show wrapped up, Sam Carter took a moment to speak candidly about the importance of mental health and reaching out to a professional when dealing with depression and other issues. It was an impressively genuine moment and when it was followed up by an excellent performance of their hit, “Doomsday,” it made for a perfect finish to a great show.

Overall, this was an extremely enjoyable concert with three impressive acts in a row. While She Sleeps was a pleasant surprise as I hand’t heard a single song before their performance, Thy Art is Murder came incredibly close to stealing the show with a brutal set, and Architects showed once again that they are one of the premier groups in the metalcore genre.

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Veronica Stanton Debuts With Catchy and Heartfelt EP

827 Miles is an incredibly listenable debut which has me excited to cover many more releases from Veronica Stanton.

Veronica Stanton is a country singer/songwriter from Jenkintown, PA and based in Nashville, TN. She got her start in local shows performing with a family band and learned sing and play music at home. She stepped out into more solo work in high school and began to pursue songwriting in earnest in college. After graduating, she came to Nashville and began playing the circuit of writers rounds before starting to work with producer Dan Knobler. Now, she’s released her debut EP, 827 Miles, named for the distance from her hometown to Nashville.

The project opens with the title track and immediately, much of what makes this EP special is present. Veronica’s sweet, bright vocal is easily the highlight of the cut, made all the better by some clever and well-written lyrics. Her rhyme schemes create instant earworms that demand a second listen and, thanks to nice, clean production, the her personality bubbles through every line. Songs that focus on missing home are also less prominent than they once were and it’s nice to hear the topic addressed so well once again.

“Flying,” follows and quickly, the strong instrumentation begins to shine through. Anthony DaCosta helms the electric guitar, which he did quite well on Joy Williams’ album which I covered earlier this week. His gentle touch and ear for melody are invaluable to this cut and many after. Beyond this, the verse-centric structure with a two bar chorus is unique and Stanton confidently channels shades of Dolly Parton in her soft but solid delivery. It’s yet another track which seems to demand a second listen.

“Wildflower,” falls perfectly in the middle of the five tracks and fills this position incredibly well. It’s far more lighthearted, lyrically, and the vocal melody on the chorus is nothing short of fantastic. Dan Knobler’s production is almost a sugar rush of bright guitars and a well placed organ that creates a beautifully shimmering piece of pop-country. As if this wasn’t enough, Veronica proves the legitimacy of her old school aesthetic with an awesome key change in the final third that perfectly closes out the funnest track on the project.

As “Rome,” rolls around, the organ takes the front seat, as do the drums for the first time. The changes quickly set the song apart from previous entries, but the great vocals, fun lyrics, and melodic lead guitar is no less present. In fact, the chorus may be the best of the EP and Stanton’s falsettos are an interesting touch which I wish had better utilized on each track. Overall, while “Rome,” doesn’t jump out the way earlier cuts do, it’s certainly one of the strongest of the bunch.

“Won’t Be Back Soon,” brings the project to a close and the roaring electric guitar on the intro quickly establishes the track’s irreverence. This is easily the lyrical highlight of the album as she turns the classic trope of promising a quick return to home on its head by pointing out that, for her to come back would mean failure in her dreams. The brilliant touch of storytelling is just icing on the cake of one more fantastic instrumental, complete with a rocking organ solo. “Won’t Be Back Soon,” is a perfect closer and brings the theme of the EP full circle.

Ultimately, I’m left without much to complain about. Each track is perfectly paced, well mixed, and well written. The theme is cohesive but not overbearing and Veronica’s voice is wonderfully at home in this modernized version of golden age, women’s country.

827 Miles is an incredibly listenable debut which has me excited to cover many more releases from Veronica Stanton.

5/5

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Cage The Elephant Strikes Again With Excellent Fifth LP

Social Cues is yet another well executed and perfectly paced set of jams from one of the most consistent acts in the rock genre.

Cage the Elephant is a garage rock band from Bowling Green, Kentucky. Oddly, their first taste of success came in the UK when their 2008 self-titled debut peaked at number 38 on the UK charts thanks to the popularity of their first single, “Ain’t No Rest for the Wicked.” The album went on to achieve platinum certification in the US and their follow up, Thank You, Happy Birthday was able to reach number two on American charts. Perhaps their best known release came with 2013’s Melophobia which allowed the band to showcase their massive range and penchant for ear worm melodies. After the relatively warm reception of Tell Me I’m Pretty, which including a Grammy win Best Rock Album,  for best in 2015, and a few high profile festival performances, fans were clamoring for a fifth release and they got it in Social Cues.

The biggest growth we see on the album comes in Daniel Tichenor’s bass guitar lines. From the opener and best track, “Broken Boy,” to later cuts like “Dance Dance,” the bass is given quite a bit of leeway and brought to the front of the mix in much of the album. Allowing the bass to drive the arrangement in this way gives the record an extremely unique sound in addition to freeing up the guitars to be a bit more creative.

Matt Shultz takes that freedom and runs with it on lead guitar. On a song like “Night Running,” where most bands would come off as hackish for the inclusion of reggae elements, the lead guitar saves transforms the cut into a rather enjoyable piece of the album. “House of Glass,” on the other hand, is an extremely straightforward blues-rock track which benefits immeasurably from bold and creative guitar work across its runtime.

Even more impressive than his work as lead guitarist, however, is Shultz work as the album’s lead vocalist. Songs like the title track or the later “Ready to Let Go,” were absolutely lodged in my mind after the first listen thanks to good performance and even better writing. This is hardly surprising as Cage has written some of the catchiest rock tunes of the last decade, but it can’t be overstated what a difference this makes in the overall project.

The guitar, as well as the rest of the deceptively wide instrumental pallet, is made much better by the production work of John Hill. Hill’s somewhat limited discography is quite impressive and he’s especially notable for his ability to mix catchy pop tunes with abrasive and experimental rock elements. This album is no exception as tracks like “Black Madonna,” and “Skin and Bones,” while catchy, incorporate a fairly gritty soundscape.

On the other hand, Social Cues also features a few unique forays into a more psychedelic influences. Tracks like “Love’s the Only Way,” and “What I’m Becoming,” feature entirely different instrumental pallets and are built on slower tempos than the rest of the album. For the most part, these experiments work well, but they suffer for being so wholly separate from the rest of the album. I would’ve liked to see these elements better integrated into other songs.

The record, however, does have a few missteps. Perhaps its worst sin is poor lyricism, embodied by the later cut, “The War is Over,” those it’s certainly not the only track to suffer from this. Most of the lyrics, while not noticeably bad, just don’t say anything and when they do, they’re filled with vague and boring platitudes about love or peace. Of course, most don’t listen to a garage rock record for the lyrical brilliance, but it is a missed opportunity to add to the already impressive sound.

Social Cues’ best quality, however, is best heard in its final two tracks, “Tokyo Smoke,” and “Goodbye.” Though these tracks don’t do anything out of the ordinary from the rest of the album, I found myself amazed by the fact that I was still intently listening by the time I reached these final cut. The excellent pacing across the 13 track, 40 minute runtime makes this an extremely enjoyable listen, and there’s not a skippable track in the bunch. It may not be perfect, but it keeps you listening and entertained throughout, which is all you can ask for.

Social Cues is yet another well executed and perfectly paced set of jams from one of the most consistent acts in the rock genre.

7/10

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Catfish and the Bottlemen Stay True to Form For Better or Worse on Third Release

The Balance is a fun project full of great efforts that just can’t quite break the atmosphere of its own uninventive creation.

Catfish and the Bottlemen are an indie/alt-rock outfit from Wales. The debuted with 2014’s The Balcony which went platinum shortly after its release. Prior to their debut, the famously cut their teeth playing in the parking lot before larger bands’ gigs, and that experience very clearly informed much of their commanding sound. After the massive success, the launched two tours and dropped The Ride as a follow up LP in 2016, which went gold. The back to back strong releases netted the band a spot as an opener on Green Day’s Revolution Radio tour in 2017. In January of this year, Catfish and the Bottlemen released a new single and announced the release of their third studio record, The Balance. It’s finally here, and it’s mostly meets expectations.

One strong addition to The Balance that wasn’t nearly as prevalent on previous releases is a string of excellent bass lines. On tracks like “2all,” and “Basically,” Benji Blakeway is given the front seat, melodically speaking, for much of the runtime. His parts are well written and he performs confidently but, of course, the tone of the bass can’t be ignored. The thickness that Blakeway along with, presumably, the production team achieved is fantastic, and it brings another level to his work.

Additionally, Bob Hall’s drums are quite the asset. On a cut like “Fluctuate,” he finds a danceable rhythm and delivers it throughout, where as on “Mission,” his bombastic style guides the group extremely well through multiple timing and style changes. His style is nothing revolutionary in rock music and he rarely shows incredible speed or complex rhythms, but there’s something to be said for reliable simplicity, and that is delivered in spades.

Of course, this is a rock album, and so it’s nothing without the guitars. Luckily, Johnny Bond, the band’s newest member, holds this down quite well. Here, Catfish seems to have improved the most over previous efforts as they’ve found a consistent tone and style which works well with their sound. Tracks like “Sidetrack,” and “Coincide,” feature driving and catchy riffs that will remain in a listeners head for quite a while. 

The album’s strongest points, however, are Van McCann’s vocal performances. From the opener, “Longshot,” to the closer, “Overlap,” and even cuts throughout the middle like “Encore,” McCann brings a confidence and punk energy which is, frankly, more that what he has any right to. His range is quite impressive and, thanks to a handful of grin-worthy one liners, he’s charming enough to carry the record through most of its rough points.

All this being said, I am left with a few complaints, one of which I’d expected before ever hearing The Balance and had hoped the band would be able to mitigate better than they did. Namely, this album can often be boring. It lacks and width whatsoever in its instrumental pallet, and each cut comes in somewhere around the three to four minute range and is built on nearly a identical structure. This can often ignored thanks to strong performances and a magnetic frontman, but on songs like “Conversation,” and “Intermission,” the veil of talent just can’t obscure the numbers by which this album was painted.

However, that certainly doesn’t make the record unenjoyable. In fact, if you want to shut your brain off for a moment and enjoy some fun, meat and potatoes alt-rock, The Balance is the album for you. There’s plenty to enjoy, especially on the first few listens, and it’s worth checking out for any fans of the alt-rock scene that once ruled the world just a few years back. However, there just isn’t enough risk or creativity to be found here, and the record suffers for it.

The Balance is a fun project full of great efforts that just can’t quite break the atmosphere of its own uninventive creation.

5/10

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