The Tree of Forgiveness Review

     For anyone who’s following my social media in the past few months, my excitement for this project should come as no surprise, and one should, therefore, know that I plan to explore this record in further detail than many of my reviews, so for those who are short on time, let me sum it up quickly. The Tree of Forgiveness is, without a doubt, the best record I’ve heard so far this year. Now, let’s dive in to why.

   When the world first heard about the Outlaw Country legend’s plans to release a brand new album this year, his first collection of completely new music in thirteen years, all were curious as to what angle he’d take. At first, some feared that this may be some kind of commentary on modern politics or any number of other possibilities which may be labeled collectively as “the worst.” Many also entertained the concept that this could be a dark, brooding goodbye to the world of music, a la late Johnny Cash, as Prine is nearing an age which would make this appropriate. Instead, listeners got a treat which no one could’ve guessed: Just one more entry into Prine’s already fabulous catalog.

   The record’s opener, “Knockin’ on Your Screen Door,” sets aside all anticipation of seriousness with the bouncy guitar lead played by Prine himself. With the addition of a simple rhythm,  impressive mandolin and electric guitar work from the band, and a classic bluegrass harmony, John is back, and it’s a blast.

   This style continues through the next tracks, “I Have Met My Love Today,” accompanied by an erratic, but effect hand-clap rhythm and a measured, female harmony vocal layered of Prine’s, and “Egg and Daughter Nite, Lincoln Nebraska, 1967 (Crazy Bone,)” which, despite what the length of the title may suggest, is yet another enjoyable romp, accented by John’s still excellent guitar picking and an energetic back up vocalist.

   It isn’t until “Summer’s End,” that we are treated with any type of sincerity. The track is a somber contemplation on the loneliness of an empty home and the inability to bare the pain any longer.  Here, we start to get a hint of a what a talented artist Prine is, as he, seemingly understanding the effectiveness of his aged and somewhat broken voice, uses his vocal parts to tug at heartstrings in a way that only he can.

   “Caravan of Fools,” closes out the first half on an interesting note, using a minor key and thought provoking chord progression to build an air of mystery about the track. In the end, the change is welcome and effective, showing John’s range and writing ability in a new light.

   “Lonesome Friends of Science,” despite an irritating, science fiction sound effect on the intro, forms into an excellent opener for the albums second act. The organ work in the background is a particularly inspired decision, presumably made by producer, Dave Cobb, whom we will touch on later. The lyrics simply praise his modest life, all based on the premise that he does not mind of the world ends any day now, because he doesn’t live there, he lives in Tennessee only.

   “No Ordinary Blues,” features even more guitar picking and organ, as we begin to see a pattern for the instrumentation. Prine’s vocals sound very well produced on this track, better than anywhere else on the project.

   “Boundless Love” can be somewhat forgettable, but this may be mostly because of its placement between a couple of the best tracks on the album, but if this is truly what one would call the “worst track,” that is a complement to the unimpeachable quality of this record. This song is also one of the first to heavily introduce the concept of God into the lyrical cannon so to speak of The Tree of Forgiveness.

   What follows is an excellent candidate for the best song in the entire track-listing. While the lyrics are a bit repetitive, the three part harmonies on the chorus and the violin work to catapult an already great song into the heart of every bluegrass fan within earshot.

   “When I get to Heaven,” closes out the experience with heart, excitement, and John Prine’s infectious happiness. There’s even a Kazoo! It’s the closest Prine comes to contemplating the issues of old age and death, but even this, he does with joy and talent.

   The key to The Tree of Forgiveness is that every piece of the puzzle fits perfectly.

   The record is paced very well, short tracks leaving listeners still fulfilled and only one song, “Lonesome Friends of Science,” clocking in over four minutes.

   Prine’s guitar work is, as expected, wonderful. However, the rest of the instrumentalists keep up admirably, and the organ work throughout the project is particularly inspired. All of this is handled well by Country music production extraordinaire: Dave Cobb.

   John’s vocal work on Tree is tender and emotional, and really serves as the highlight of this effort, alongside some really fantastic lyrics. Tracks like my personal favorite, “Summer’s End” seamlessly blend reminiscence with wit in a way that only John Prine can, and has since his  self-titled, debut LP in 1971.

   In a world of Stapletons, Simpsons, and Isbells taking time to honor the country music of old, it is beyond refreshing to hear one of the all time greats come back to remind us all why he deserves our honor.

8/10

HEAR THE ALBUM – https://open.spotify.com/album/13UwfQZqne7ZQIkUZsAPLg

LATEST VIDEO – https://youtu.be/kBwsRdX_pEA

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Author: brendonsbeats

I'm a Sophomore at Middle Tennessee State University, studying audio-production while writing and playing music in Nashville. I love music more than anything else in the world, and I run this blog with the hope of introducing people to some great music that I love!

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