Arctic Monkeys Present Brave New Sound on Sixth Studio Album

     The Arctic Monkey’s have been blues rock darlings since their 2006 debut, Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not, which was certified gold and introduced the world to a kind of pure garage rock which had been missing for nearly a decade at that point. Their proceeding three releases in 2007, 2009, and 2011 each charted moderately well, and received platinum certifications in Britain, the band’s home country. However, the groups career trajectory changed forever with the massive success of 2013’s AM.

   The album was a 40 minute masterpiece which seemingly flaunted the band’s powerful sound and technical ability in the faces of anyone who would listen. Drawing on wide-ranging inspirations and utilizing fantastic production techniques, The Arctic Monkeys had created a rock album that truly felt like a classic from the first note. After a five year hiatus, the group is back with Tranquility Base Hotel & Casino, an album that simply refuses to follow in the footsteps of its predecessor, but instead forges a fascinating new path.

   Lead vocalist, Alex Turner, referred to this record, as well as some of his personal favorite projects from other bands, as being “like places you can visit,” and this is certainly true for the majority of the album. Songs like “Star Treatment,” “She Looks Like Fun,” and the title track really do have a palpable energy to them, and instrumentals which listeners can swim in for many repeat listens.

   One important change which rears its head on this albums is the sharp turn away from the noisy nature of the groups earlier garage rock influence. Instead of multiple layers which listeners can slowly unpack through focus and replays, the Monkeys instead aim for a more minimalist style, using repetitive instrumentals to present new lead ideas on a silver platter for every listener. Guitar solos, like that of “One Point Perspective,” or Nick O’Malley’s excellent bass guitar work on tracks like “American Sports” are no longer consigned to the back of the mix, but instead rise to the top clearly.

   This style, of course, doesn’t always work. Namely, the two song run of my personal least favorite track, “Golden Trunks” followed by “Four Out of Five” fail to capture as effectively as the rest of the project because they present nothing of significance. Instead, we are left with two forgettable and repetitive instrumentals which play to unimportant lyrics. The midpoint lull on this record threatens to take the winds from the freshly opened sails, before they are saved by the eerie “The World’s First Ever Monster Truck Flip,” which benefits from some of the best lyrics in the Arctic Monkeys discography.

   Above all else, this album is made by the absolutely fantastic vocal performance and lyricism of Alex Turner. One needs only listen to tracks like “Batphone” and “Science Fiction” to feel the importance of Turner’s presence. He instantly turns relatively uneventful songs into ear-perking hits with nothing but his smokey tone and commitment to the unique feel of the project. There is a clear resemblance and influence from the late, great David Bowie, and this record will almost definitely send listeners directly to revisitations of the legend’s work as well.

   Lyrically, Turner spends almost the entire runtime criticizing the role of social media and technology in our modern society, following the lose conceptual framework of post-apocalyptic human race, before closing the album with my favorite track, “Ultracheese.”

   The song is a swinging, reminiscent ode to what Turner calls, “America in the golden age.” Heavily inspired by the rat-pack, and jazz vocalists like them, it departs a bit from the style we’ve heard thus far, and delivers and effective and emotional send off to an all around fantastic record.

   The 40-ish minute runtime keeps the album from overstaying its welcome, and as Turner’s final, croon is delivered, a cappella, listeners are left wondering what they’ve just heard. This is an album that requires repeat listens and focus, and it would certainly function poorly as an introduction for new fans to this band. This is because unlike the Arctic Monkeys discography up until this point, it doesn’t force you to listen or beg for your attention, but instead offers something. A sobering contemplation of modern society, a minimalistic approach to instrumentation, creative and innovative melodies, and one incredible vocal performance after another await any listener willing to give this album a try, and if you ask me, it is well worth it.

8/10

HEAR THE ALBUM: https://open.spotify.com/album/1jeMiSeSnNS0Oys375qegp

YOUTUBE LINK: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=buqIXGleG2I&list=PLTgCbzV-FEabYmih60WIG-ZRBPcsUH08u

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Author: brendonsbeats

I'm a Sophomore at Middle Tennessee State University, studying audio-production while writing and playing music in Nashville. I love music more than anything else in the world, and I run this blog with the hope of introducing people to some great music that I love!

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