Father John Misty Returns Barely a Year Later With Yet Another Classic

     Father John Misty, also known as Josh Tillman, has been a staple in the indie, singer/songwriter scene  since as early as 2003. For the first seven years and eight albums of his illustrious career, Tillman published music under his own name as well as two albums with Saxon Shore, before joining with Fleet Foxes for their 2011 release, Helplessness Blues. In 2012, however, Tillman took on the moniker of Father John Misty to release his Fear Fun album to success and much critical acclaim. Three years later, Misty returned with I Love You, Honeybear, which was, again, well received with a small group of followers and fans.

   His career took an important leap in 2017 with his sharp-witted, heavily conceptual opus of an album, Pure Comedy. In it, Tillman masterfully picked apart difficult topics like the human condition, American politics, technology addiction, and much more with his signature dark humor and soft rock instrumentation. The albums was a smash hit with critics and fans alike, finally bringing Josh the kind of mainstream success which he has deserved for so long, and almost in response to this, he followed up with uncharacteristic quickness, dropping God’s Favorite Customer just over a year after Pure Comedy.

   Surprisingly, God’s Favorite Customer is wholly unique in Misty’s discography. The lightheartedness which characterized much of his early work is nowhere to be found on this album. Lyrics, while holding to some of his classic wittiness, focus heavily on themes of death, mental instability, and desperation.

   This album can be very accurately described as the second half to Pure Comedy, because where it was an outward look at the absurdities of the modern wold, God’s Favorite Customer functions as the self-examination which should follow any such criticisms of the outside world.

   Tracks like my personal favorite, “Mr. Tillman,” and the title track dig deeply into Father John Misty’s psyche while still telling compelling narratives along the way. His lyrical abilities really shine here as he plays with points of view, one sided conversations, and mixes complex imagery with simple descriptions.

   Instrumentally, this album is a bit of a departure from its predecessors. While tracks like “Hangout at the Gallows,” and “Just Dumb Enough to Try” are built on familiar, orchestral swelling and piano driven melodies, the darker tone seems to have bled over into the music as the arrangement is far more bass-heavy and generally less sweet and whimsical than past projects.

   This album reaches its peak in its simplicity, though. Tracks like “Please Don’t Die,” “The Palace,” and “The Songwriter,” feature a very uncharacteristically stripped back set up. Relying mainly on rhythmic drum and piano work, these tracks serve to remind us all just what a treat we have in Tillman, truly one of the best writers in modern music, who is still in the prime of his career.

   Another highlight comes in the production. The vocal mix is simply fantastic. A quick listen to “Disappointing Diamonds are the Rarest of All,” or “Date Night,” would blow any careful listener away with the way that Tillman’s voice is stereo-imaged and doused in delay and reverb to create an almost ethereal sense about him. This plays especially well in these rare moments which feature much quicker tempos.

   If there are any complaints to be made here, there is a slight lack of catchy hooks to be found here. While I praise Misty for his ability to find unique vocal melodies which dance along half steps and often clash before resolving, this does bring with it a lack of catchiness. There isn’t much you’ll be singing around the house.

   Overall, though, this albums is simply inspired. Father John Misty pulls from a wide array of inspirations-a few obvious ones being The Beatles, Elton John, and Neil Diamond- to bring us an album that can somehow simultaneously feel removed from time, and yet so topical and relatable. The massive instrumentation pallet is played down and remains almost unnoticed, as each instrument has its part to play, and does it well. The lyricism is, predictably, fantastic, taking on dark themes and difficult topics with the delicate care and razor-tongued wit which only Josh Tillman has. Put simply, this record, like its predecessor, is not only one of the best albums of the year, but will likely be remembered as a bench-mark for this era.

9/10

HEAR THE ALBUM: https://open.spotify.com/album/0hMPUtgjezv7gUsmhztvPv

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Author: brendonsbeats

I'm a Sophomore at Middle Tennessee State University, studying audio-production while writing and playing music in Nashville. I love music more than anything else in the world, and I run this blog with the hope of introducing people to some great music that I love!

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