JPEGMAFIA’s Third LP is His Best and Most Daring to Date

All My Heroes Are Cornballs is a powerful and disorienting LP and an exciting addition to one of the best catalogs in the game.

JPEGMAFIA is a hip-hop artist from New York City. His debut LP, Black Ben Carson released in 2016 to critical acclaim and was quickly followed by a collaborative effort with fellow Baltimore artist, Freaky, entitled The Second Amendment. Peggy immediately became a staple of the buzzing experimental hip-hop scene and, with his 2018 LP Veteran, he established himself as one of the most formidable forces in that movement. Now, just over a year later, Peggy returns with one of the most daring projects I’ve heard in years, All My Heroes Are Cornballs.

Without a doubt, this is the most experimental record in Peggy’s catalog, and that’s clear across nearly every second of the LP. Certainly the most experimental moments come on shorter interludes like “JPEGMAFIA TYPE BEAT,” or the later “BUTTERMILK JESUS TYPE BEAT.” These short moments are bursts of near chaos which do stand out, but the entirety of the LP is laced with explosive periods of noise, but these are balanced against tracks like “Life’s Hard, Here’s A Song About Sorrel,” which are so sparse and disconnected that it seems the album could easily just fall to silence at any moments.

JPEG is at his best here when he finds a way to mix these two tendencies. On cuts like “PTSD,” and “Prone!,” he dynamically bounces from calm, grooving moments into overwhelming madness and back again. Often, the album seems just one strange sound away from falling apart before catchy hook or commanding flow pulls it back into reality. The disconnect and lack of concern for traditional structure is jarring to say the least.

Because of these constant switches, the record is almost perfectly paced. Even later tracks like “DOTS FREESTYLE REMIX,” and the closer “Papi I Missed You,” feel exciting and interesting. There’s never a moment that seems to drag or run long and, in fact, at times it feels almost a bit too fast despite the near 50 minute runtime. 

Large portions of this album, though, are fairly low-key and atmospheric. Tracks like “Beta Male Strategies,” achieve this with creative instrumentals and simple melodies. On the other hand, tracks like “Free the Frail,” or the title track build their atmosphere with a wide array of soundbites and spoken sections which are genuinely fascinating. The entire LP is covered in these well placed sound bites with everything from a dinner order at a drive through to a young girl joking about a “weed song.” It builds a world around the listener that you can’t help but want to sit in for a long time.

On the other hand, there are a handful of accessible and well written hooks. Take a cut like the opener, “Jesus Forgive Me, I Am A Thot,” or the later, equally well named “Grimy Waifu.” Here, JPEG’s ear for melody comes through with killer sung hooks which, though they often don’t repeat or stay around for long, leave a lasting effect on the listener.

Beyond this, his vocal performance is simply excellent. This is true for well-sung lines on “Kenan Vs. Kel,” as well as the bombastic flow on “Thot Tactics.” It’s also true in terms of the hilarious lyrics and professional wrestling references on tracks like “Rap Grow Old & Die x No Child Left Behind,” or “Post Verified Lifestyle.” Peggy brings an intensity and a dynamic range on this record that is just intoxicating. It may take a couple listens to even notice the strong instrumentals or production as JPEG’s lead steals the spotlight at every opportunity.

All of this is helmed wonderfully by Peggy’s wonderful production. Throughout the LP, he mixes muted percussion with explosive synths, plays with peaking and cut-outs, and crafts a near disorienting project by stacking layers of raw sound and pealing them back to reveal simple, minimalistic soundscapes. Tracks like “BBW,” and his cover of  TLC’s “No Scrubs,” which is entitled “BasicBitchTearGas,” stand out, but this is the case across the album.

All in all, this is a fantastic album. Peggy’s punk influences and carefree style is distilled into a daring collection of tracks which range wildly from white hot chaos to smooth, atmospheric beats, often within the same song. For my money, this album surpasses earlier works like Veteran and sees JPEG finding his niche in a brilliant way.

All My Heroes Are Cornballs is a powerful and disorienting LP and an exciting addition to one of the best catalogs in the game.

9/10

Post Malone Enlists SZA, Ozzy, and More for Third LP

Hollywood’s Bleeding is a fun listen that doesn’t quite meet it’s full potential.

Post Malone’s rise to the higher tiers of the hip-hop world has been relatively quick. From his 2015 breakout single, “White Iverson,” to his subsequent major label debut, Stoney in 2016, Malone quickly made a name for himself as a reliable producer of atmospheric, beat-centric tracks which make a perfect soundtrack for late night driving, or late night drinking, depending on your preference. Some have criticized his approach as being quantity over quality, and his music as “sonic wallpaper,” that isn’t meant to be listened to as much as played in the background. This reputation was crushed by 2018’s Beerbong’s & Bentley’s, one of the best rap albums of the year, which put Post on the map as serious hitmaker and a reliable producer of fun, danceable bangers. Now, with just a year for turnaround, we have yet another nearly hour long project in Hollywood’s Bleeding which, for the most part, lives up to its predecessor. 

Definitely the most significant improvement on this LP comes in the form of the strong and varied instrumentals. From the unpredictable switches on the opening title track to the genuine rock and pop influences on cuts like “Allergic,” and my favorite track, “Circles.” Post has often discussed his wide base of influences and has incorporated them into his music with a mixture of success, but his blend of pop rock and hip-hop is genuinely brilliant and provides an excellent variety over the long album.

Speaking of rock influences, the feature list on this LP has a few surprising names, to say the least. Future and Halsey turn in solid verses on “Die for Me,” and SZA is impeccable as usual on “Staring At The Sun,” but it’s Ozzy Osbourne’s appearance on “Take What You Want,” which has captivated listeners in the days since the album’s release, and for good reason: It works far better than anyone would’ve imagined. Ozzy sounds fantastic and his hook, though short, is commanding and powerful. This is all not to mention the roaring guitar solo that closes the track.

Beyond his features, Malone proves once again on this album that he’s one of the better vocalists in all of hip-hop. His warbling vibrato is here in spades on tracks like “I’m Gonna Be,” but I found myself far more impressed by the powerful belts on tracks like “Enemies,” and “On The Road.” Again, those rock influences rear their heads as he digs into his vocal cords a bit more to achieve a gritty, dynamic tone.

As one would expect, however, this album hinges quite a bit on Post’s status as one of the best hook writers in the business and, thankfully, this record is packed with singable ear-worms. “Saint-Tropez,” and “A Thousand Times,” feature some of the catchiest choruses of the year and virtually every second of the closer, “Wow,” is nothing short of addictive.

Sadly, this album really dives off of a cliff in the latter half. Easily the worst issue comes in the lyrics. The writing on tracks like “Internet,” and “I Know,” just feels lazy and uninventive, while the lyrics on “Myself,” are just bizarre and relatively meaningless, which doesn’t help a track which is already on shaky ground, sonically.

Additionally, there are some terrible features. I’ve never personally been a fan of Swae Lee’s work on “Sunflower,” despite it’s success as a single, as his voice is as bland and uninteresting as ever. This doesn’t compare, however, to Young Thug dropping yet another unlistenable verse on  “Goodbyes.” I don’t know that I’ve ever enjoyed a verse from Young Thug, and his unnerving howl is completely out of place on the otherwise inoffensive effort.

Ultimately, this album is something of a mixed bag. On the one hand, Post has developed several elements which peaked out on the last release. He’s taking his wide-ranging influences more seriously, successfully incorporating rock and folk in a brilliant way. He also has lost a step in his talent for writing excellent hooks and working with strong features, for the most part.

Unfortunately, he’s still failed to learn from the mistake which has plagued every single release in his catalog: his insistence on including seemingly every idea that comes to his mind on the final album line-up. Because of this, the record is far too long with poor pacing, and the entire last third, with the exception of the closer, feels entirely half baked and underdeveloped.

Despite this, the album is a blast. Its shining moments are blinding and its weak points can easily be ignored. It’s just a shame that poor pacing and a few annoying features keep the LP from living up to its predecessors.

Hollywood’s Bleeding is a fun listen that doesn’t quite meet it’s full potential.

6/10

Lil Nas X’s Debut EP Is a Fun and Unique Listen

7 is a fun listen which, while it won’t be winning any awards, is certainly a must-listen for fans of the young, genre bending front man.

Lil Nas X is a hip-hop/rap artist from Atlanta, Georgia. He was almost entirely obscure before the release of his debut single, “Old Town Road,” in December of 2018, which catapulted him to the very top of the music world. The track topped the Billboard Hot 100 and was eying the top of the country charts before Billboard chose, in a relatively controversial decision, that the track would no longer be listed as country because of its “musical composition.” Regardless, the single has topped the charts in at least seven countries including the US and is certified as triple platinum at the time of this review. Now, with the world watching, the 20 year old artist is attempting to bring his genre bending style to a longer form with his first studio EP, 7.

The project opens and closes with Lil Nas X’s titular smash hit, “Old Town Road.” The recent remix featuring Billy Ray Cyrus opens the album and it’s far better than the original, aided  by its placement on this album. There isn’t much left to be said about this track that hasn’t been said already, but it is worth pointing out that this is one of the most genuinely fun tracks I’ve heard in years. Every element is relatively simple, and combining trap and country is far from a brand new idea, but every attempt thus far has felt like a cynical cash grab. Lil Nas X is the first artist who’s attempt at this sound feels genuine, and I do believe that to be the key factor in this song’s success.

“Panini,” follows and as this EP’s second official single, it’s quite a track in its own right. Once again, Lil Nas X isn’t reinventing the wheel, but he does have a handful of interestingly diverse inspirations which find their way into the finish product. Probably the most obvious example is the chorus hook on this track which is a direct allusion to Nirvana’s “In Bloom.” All told, the track isn’t nearly as groundbreaking as that which proceeds it, but its another feel good cut that will have listeners dancing even after repeated listens.

The next track is “F9mily,” and it’s here where we start to see some of the cracks in Lil Nas X’s abilities. He’s aiming to put his own spin on the kind of bright, garage rock that has been popular for the past several years, but he falls short in almost every way. The instrumental is rather bland and aside from some nice choral background vocals, offers very little of substance. Even worse, though, is Lil Nas X’s vocals which are just sleepy and boring, completely failing to live up to the energy brought by the instrumentation. Ultimately, it’s just a misstep and it’s easily the worst track on the EP.

“Kick It,” is up next, and he starts to bring the project back on the rails fairly quickly. The instrumental is still a bit weak and none of the bars are particularly impressive, but the horns are a nice addition to the instrumental pallet and and it does feature a handful of fairly funny lyrical moments.

“Rodeo,” sees a return to the country rap stylings which brought him to prominence and it’s probably one of the best tracks on the project. It’s lyrically hilarious, the guitar riff at the center of the instrumental is fantastic, and the Cardi B feature near the end works far better than it has any right to. The song is certainly no “Old Town Road,” and I respect X’s decision not to fill the EP with country/rap mashes like this, but I must say that I enjoyed this cut quite a bit.

Unfortunately, “Bring U Down,” derails the record a bit once again. The guitar solo is enjoyable and quite unexpected, and the bass guitar riff that guides the track is fairly catchy. I don’t even mind the simplistic lyrics, but again, X just doesn’t have the energy in his voice that’s needed to carry an upbeat rock tune like this. His lethargic lead holds this album back in a quite a few places.

“C7osure,” is the final track on the EP, ignoring the gratuitous reappearance of “Old Town Road,” and it’s relatively inoffensive. This is definitely the most forgettable track on the project and could have been left off without complaint, but there are a few bright moments, most notably the layered vocals on the chorus and the intriguing piano sample.

All together, I must say the Lil Nas X has been fairly successful in staving off accusations of being a “one hit wonder,” with this EP. There aren’t all that many complex elements to the EP, but he is breaking new ground in the sense that he combines the auto-crooning, trap style with country, rock, and a few other smaller inspirations in a way that feels far more genuine and listenable than other acts who have the same aim.

7 is a fun listen which, while it won’t be winning any awards, is certainly a must-listen for fans of the young, genre bending front man.

4/5

AMAZON LINK: https://amzn.to/2UbiiiB

Denzel Curry Brings Short and Bombastic New Album

ZUU sees Denzel return to his raw roots for a love letter to his home and one of his most listenable LP’s to date.

Denzel Curry is a Florida based rapper who rose to popularity with his 2015 single “Ultimate.” It was loud, hard-hitting, and extremely lyrical and, although the song stood well on its own merits, it got most of its exposure by becoming a part of popular meme. Regardless, Denzel found his way on to the much maligned 2016 XXL Freshman Class and gave the only impressive performance in a terrible freshman cypher. Later that year, he released his major label debut, Imperial, which was violent, vulgar, and filled its 40 minute runtime with a breakneck pace. It’s jazz influences balanced well against Curry’s rapping style, which can best be described as “lyrical trap.” Curry followed the album’s impressive success with 2018’s TA13OO, finding even more critical acclaim and commercial success by drastically changing his song. Now, less than a year later, we once again find a very raw form of Denzel on this third LP, ZUU.

The albums is quite impressive thanks to a handful of elements, not the least of which being the unique instrumental approach which Curry takes. Tracks like “BIRDZ,” or the very short “BUSHY B INTERLUDE,” showcase this quite well as they bring the melody to the forefront with abrasive yet listenable tones. While the record focuses very heavily on percussion, it still makes more than a few impressive efforts to bring a melody forward.

On top of this, the bass lines are simply fantastic. The opener and title track may be the most obvious example of this but it plays quite a role in middling songs like “SPEEDBOAT.” The bass brings so much power and controls so much real estate within the mix that it refuses to be ignored, instead carrying a handful of tracks to even more impressive final products.

Additionally, we’re given quite an impressive cast of guest star lyricists on the features list. Tay Keith’s work on “AUTOMATIC,” brings a excellent energy which very nearly matches that of Curry himself. Similarly, Sam Sneak brings a commanding level of bombast to every second of his verse on “SHAKE 88.” While the features list is populated with a handful of relative unknowns, each of them bring their best efforts and prove their place on the album.

Thanks to the short style of writing, the pacing is also quite strong. While ZUU does seem to drag just a bit near the end, it’s quickly saved by the unstoppable, manic energy of a song like “CAROLMART” or the closer, “P.A.T.” Denzel seems to care so much about these tracks that he can give an impressive performance throughout every second, improving great cuts and saving bad ones.

That brings us to the top reason why ZUU is such a strong album, namely Denzel Curry’s explosive flow on nearly every track. Tracks like “RICKY,” and “WISH,” feature some of the best flows I’ve heard all year. Curry’s ability to write one brutal flow after another just doesn’t exist elsewhere in mainstream rap, and yet it’s the very thing that has brought him to such a spotlight so early. His flow clearly draws from elements of drill, bling, Florida rap, which is very refreshing, but he brings along his own spin which makes Denzel Curry one of the best artists on the market today.

I do, admittedly, have a few complaints. Worst of all, the album features three interludes, two of which, “YOO,” and “BLACKLAND 66.6” are fairly meaningless and unnecessary. In addition, I imagine the record could feel a bit draining for a listener who is unfamiliar with Denzel’s relentless flow and lyrical style.

However, the good far outweighs the bad. ZUU certainly isn’t the expansive concept piece its predecessor claimed to be, but instead, it feels like a purging of unused ideas from previous sessions. Despite this, the record feels entirely cohesive and makes for a fantastic listening experience.

ZUU sees Denzel return to his raw roots for a love letter to his home and one of his most listenable LP’s to date.

6/10

Tyler, The Creator Drops Daring Sixth LP

IGOR is a bold and well executed entry into one of the most excited discographies in modern hip-hop.

Tyler, The Creator is a rapper and producer from Ladera Heights, California. He debuted in 2009 with the Bastard mixtape which found impressive success, followed by 2011’s Goblin, which made Tyler a household name and landed in the top five on Billboard. During this early portion of his career, Tyler founded the Odd Future rap collective which spawned the careers of multiple stars in today’s alternative hip-hop scene. He went on to drop Wolf and Cherry Bomb, both of which sold quite well. However, after four successful LP’s, his brash, bass-heavy style was beginning to fatigue many listeners. This changed with 2017’s Flower Boy which brought an entirely new sound to Tyler’s discography along with genuinely heartfelt lyrics which dealt with lover, maturity, and coming to terms with his sexuality. Now, two years later, his much anticipated sixth album, IGOR has arrived.

From the first moments of the opener, “IGOR’S THEME,” the daring and unique production style of this record is immediately apparent. Throughout the song, virtually every mixing decision is surprising and unpredictable, particularly the contrast between the organic drums and the very industrial melodies. This is even more noticeable on a cut like “NEW MAGIC WAND,” which boosts a rattling bass and distorted sound effects to all but bury the soft, genuine vocals which cary the lead from behind. Consistently, Tyler chooses to bury excellent melodies as gems to be found on repeat listens while blasting some of the most commanding elements to the forefront.

In addition to the production, the instrumental pallet itself is shockingly broad and creative. “I THINK,” and the closer, “ARE WE STILL FRIENDS?” uses a wide range of interesting synths and percussion instruments to bring an almost mind-bending sound to life. On the other hand, a later cut like “GONE, GONE/THANK YOU,” utilizes everything from wispy acoustic guitars and guttural basses to bizarre vocal effects and oddly bright shakers and snares. Nearly every track is an adventure as we’re never quite given the boundaries for where Tyler is willing to go. Instead, each song feels like a perpetual experiment.

Beyond this, the album’s strongest quality is its tendency to drop into some of the most danceable grooves of the year. Tracks like the massive hit, “EARFQUAKE,” or the equally fantastic, “A BOY IS A GUN,” feature excellent, ear worm choruses which blend perfectly between the modern sensibilities of hip-hop music and a sort of synthetic, industrial Motown style which seems entirely unique to this album.

While this is certainly not the measured, balanced, and well-developed style one would generally associate with good pacing, IGOR instead aims to incapsulate Tyler’s manic energy and does so perfectly. Songs like “RUNNING OUT OF TIME,” and “I DON’T LOVE YOU ANYMORE” are perhaps the best examples of this, though it’s apparent throughout. Each track seems to bounce endlessly from one creative idea to another, expecting the listener to fill in the blanks to connect them. Through this, the project keeps you inthralled for its full runtime.

Another trick which helps the pacing as well as the songwriting to punch above its weight is Tyler’s tendency to write in parts instead of traditional choruses and verses. Take tracks like “PUPPET,” and “WHAT’S GOOD,” for example, where the entire makeup of the song seems to come unglued and reform every few moments, shifting wildly from heavy hitting bars to flowing grooves and everything in between. Again, the manic energy of the album’s writer bleeds through every note, making every cut a loosely tethered amalgamation of contrary ideas.

Ultimately, I’m left with very few complaints. The album’s loose concept is a bit difficult to follow, but its largely irrelevant and overshadowed by more than a few incredible songs. Mostly, I feel admiration for Tyler, himself. With his early work facing quite a bit of criticism for its abrasive and at times sparse tone, he could easily have retreated into a safer form of mainstream hip-hop. Instead, he stuck to his guns and now comes out the other side having crafted a truly unique sound which is a clear advancement of the sound on the earlier records.

IGOR is a bold and well executed entry into one of the most excited discographies in modern hip-hop.

8/10

Anderson .Paak’s Quick Turnaround Yields Fun but Not Quite Stellar Results

Ventura is a flawed but ultimately electrifying piece of modern soul and yet another great addition to the ever growing Anderson .Paak catalog.

Anderson .Paak is a hip-hop/R&B artist from Oxnard, California. He debuted with a few notable underground projects in the early 2010’s, including the Cover Art EP which aimed to reclaim blues and R&B tracks written by black artists which were better known for being covered by white artists in the 1950’s. His breakthrough came first with 2014’s Venice, and then with his 2016 smash hit, Miami. The latter is a far more impressive release and brought to life the grooving, soul-funk style which set .Paak apart from the other members of his 2016 XXL Freshman Class. With his 2018 follow up, Oxnard, Anderson was launched into the stratosphere of modern music with what was largely regarded as one of the best albums of the year. Now, just a year later, he’s returned with Ventura, yet another groovy piece of Neo-soul mastery.

Eagle-eyed music fans will notice before they even hear a sound that the record has a fantastic lineup of features on nearly every track. While the vast majority of these are quite impressive, two stand about above the heap. Namely, the one and only André 3000’s tongue-twisting verse on the opener, “Come Home,” and Smokey Robinson’s silky presence on the follow up, “Make It Better.” In both instances, the features elevate the tracks to incredible heights.

Despite an incredible ensemble, Anderson still commands a leading presence across the project, and carries a few of the tracks alone. “Yada Yada,” is an absolute clinic in soul and funk vocals with .Paak’s rough sweetness burning through every line. “Chosen One,” however, would be entirely forgettable if not for the fantastic rap verse near the end with a few eye popping name drops and a fascinating flow. He’s really come into his own, and his work on this record is extremely exciting for longtime fans.

Beyond vocal performances, Ventura’s instrumentals are electrifying. Each cut features a massive pallet from an interesting mix of organic and electronic sources. “Reachin’ 2 Much” sees a foundation of thick bass guitar and thumping kick drums supporting howling synths and bombastic horn sections. “Winner’s Circle,” on the other hand pulls elements like skat singing and woodwind melodies and a hilarious opening sample.

The record is at it’s best however, when the entire band finds the somewhat intangible groove they seem to be searching for at all times. This happens to great effect on “Jet Black,” a track which is essentially carried by the groove and lacks the bells and whistles of other cuts. The album’s highlight, however, is the lead single “King James,” which is built on an undeniable beat and adorned with thoughtful, politically charged lyrics and a luscious saxophone. It’s here where Anderson is at his best.

I do, however, have a handful of complaints. The most consistent issue throughout is pacing. More than a few tracks drag on far longer than necessary and seem to go nowhere for the last half. “Good Heals,” on the other hand, is criminally short and feels extremely half baked.

The most frustrating shortcoming, though, is the way that Ventura absolutely limps through the finish line. The closing tracks, “Twilight,” and “What Can We Do?” Are both completely lifeless and unnecessary. The Nate Dogg feature on the latter is a nice touch, but the track itself feels like a lost, Nate Dogg B-side and is totally out of step with the rest of the record. It’s a shame, because the rest of the project is quite strong, and could’ve been brought home well.

That being said, Ventura is a success, overall. Once again, Anderson .Paak has come through with a unique brand of Neo-soul and funk that has the ability to excite fans young and old. His respect for the masters like Smokey and James Brown is palpable, but his rap background bring a unique spin.

Ventura is a flawed but ultimately electrifying piece of modern soul and yet another great addition to the ever growing Anderson .Paak catalog.

6/10

AMAZON LINK: https://amzn.to/2UbiiiB

Young Socrates Drops Heady, Experimental Debut EP

Kill the Gods isn’t perfect, but it’s quite fascinating and a strong first entry to the Young Socrates catalog.

Young Socrates is a 20-year-old alternative hip-hop artist, producer and mixing engineer From Lagos, Nigeria and based in Murfreesboro, TN. He’s made something of a name for himself with a series of Soundcloud releases over the last year. He’s notable for heavily industrial production, an experimental mixing style, and lyrics with heavy philosophical and absurdist themes. Following some success from lead singles, Kill the Gods was released last week and it’s quite an experience.

The record opens with what is perhaps my favorite cut, “Slow Victim.” The instrumental intro clocks in just under two minutes, but captures a fascinating style in such a short time. The repetitive percussion and electronic sound pallet is immediately gripping, and the continued additions of layer after layer build to a cacophonous fever pitch. The track is at once fascinating, yet alienating, and it sets a strong tone for the rest of the project.

The title track follows with a slightly softer pallet and introduces Socrates’ vocals quite well. The odd time signature and lack of overall structure makes the track fairly unpredictable, and the short runtime insures that the listener never does quite catch up. That being said, the lyrics are introspective and draw an interesting and quite informed link to the work of Absurdist legend Albert Camus by treating the mundanity of everyday as a hell in of itself.

“The Light,” begins with a uniquely organic sound, featuring an intriguing bass riff and a soft, but somewhat lifeless piano lead. The vocal performance is a bit hard to grasp, but tonally, it works quite well. The soulless, almost 8-bit sound effects which perform the hook are an excellent touch, and it’s this blend of the recognizable and comforting with the lifeless and at times disorienting which characterizes what is so impressive about this project.

The EP’s most popular single, “Devil in the Streets,” falls fourth, and it’s a much more straightforward cut than previous tracks. Lyrically, this is clear and away the highlight of tracklist, with Socrates’ biting critique of religion coming through in every line, though cut with a healthy dose of absurdism in its refusal to provide serious solutions. The percussion is also at its best here, with a sharp snare slicing the mix in half during the verse. These qualities combined with yet another odd structure and short runtime make for one of the best tracks on the record.

“Old Jargon,” is the closer and by far the longest cut in the list. Because of this, the lyrics are far more sprawling and, while a bit unfocused, center on the same themes of religious criticism and Absurdism. The instrumental gets a bit repetitive, but the synths are well performed and abrasive guitar lines are excellent. Ultimately, it’s a strong finish to an excellent project.

All my praise of this EP notwithstanding, I am left with a few minor criticisms. A few of the instrumentals, while well mixed and produced, could use more variety. If each track had carried the intensity of the opener, or explored some more adventurous sonic ideas, this could’ve been solved. Additionally, Socrates’ flow could do with a bit more range. Though his rhyme schemes are impressive and entertaining, the lack of unique delivery on each track masks a lot of the work that went into the lyricism.

Ultimately, however, Kill the Gods is fantastic! Lyrically, the intentional and well written inclusion of heavily philosophical themes is quite an accomplishment, made all the more noticeable by a perfectly cohesive tone in each track. It’s well written, daring, and often bewildering upon the first few listens.

Kill the Gods isn’t perfect, but it’s quite fascinating and a strong first entry to the Young Socrates catalog.

4/5

AMAZON LINK: https://amzn.to/2UbiiiB