Billie Eilish Debuts With a Dark but Fun LP

WHEN WE ALL FALL ASLEEP, WHERE DO WE GO? Is a mostly well executed debut for a very exciting young artist who could easily go on to be something truly transformative for pop music.

Billie Eilish is pop singer/songwriter from Los Angeles. Her meteoric rise to fame has become something of a phenomena. Her 2016 debut single, “Ocean Eyes,” was certified platinum quickly after it’s release and left fans immediately clamoring for more, which Billie delivered. The track found it’s way onto her first EP, Don’t Smile At Me which is certified gold and peaked at number one on the US alternative charts. By 2018, she was opening for Florence + The Machine before headlining her own massive tour the same year. With a multitude of music videos and a remarkably consistent aesthetic throughout, Billie is able to appeal at once to fans of alternative and mainstream pop, and her music itself, while fairly accessible, incorporates more than a few unique, experimental elements. After rising to the top of the industry in just a couple years, she’s finally released her first full length LP, WHEN WE ALL FALL ASLEEP, WHERE DO WE GO?

Unlike most modern pop stars, Billie’s music certainly doesn’t live and die by her vocal performance. She does, however, have a few strong showings on this album. On cuts like the softer, “when the party’s over,” or the melodic “wish you were gay,” Eilish’s breathy, haunting lead is an invaluable asset to the arrangement. Overall, while Billie is still certainly not known as a pop powerhouse on the level of an Ariana Grande, she adds to the album in a very unique way.

One can also not discount the value of the aesthetic she has so carefully crafted and continues to grow on this project. The dark but rhythmic flow on the album’s opener and best track, “bad guy,” makes her feel genuinely otherworldly while her lyrics on “all the good girls go to hell,” layered over the chiming church bells and bouncing pianos are almost enigmatic. Over her fairly short career, she’s built what amounts to a fascinating character which bleeds through every second of this album.

This all being said, the true star of this project is Billie’s brother, Finneas, who carries co-writing and production duties on every cut. While I can nitpick a few of the technical aspects of his work, there’s no denying the creative and daring style he holds to. I find myself especially impressed by his willingness to use fairly abrasive sound pallets like the reedy screeches on “bury a friend,” the almost terrifying effects on Billies voice in “8,” or the jarring, twisted keys on “ilomilo,” a track which is entirely saved by great production. Of course, this isn’t a Death Grips record, but for a mainstream pop album, the pallet is quite daring.

Beyond this, his manic energy and meticulous stereo images are absolutely engulfing. The mix of the very clean bass guitar and jazz inspirations with unpredictable vocal effects on “xanny,” makes it one of the strongest tracks on the list, not to mention the wonderful harmonies near the end which also adorn nearly all of the closer, “goodbye,” quite successfully. And of course, the repeated sound bites from The Office on “my strange addiction,” are irresistibly hilarious.

There are a few downfalls on the album however. Most of these pitfalls are due to weaknesses in the fundamentals of the music, namely uninventive lyrics and unimpressive vocals. This is hidden when the full creativity of Billie or Finneas is on display, but that’s not always the case. “you should see me in a crown,” for example, comes off as a fairly bland piece of trap pop, while “listen before i go,” and “i love you,” are back to back snoozers only saved by a strong closer. Essentially, when the production and arrangement is stripped back, the album falters, and while that will likely change as Eilish gains more experience, she does pretty well to avoid that position for the majority of the runtime.

All said, this is a very strong debut outing for Billie. It’s by no means perfect, and at times her lack of experience does shine through, but it’s a fun piece of nocturnal pop that brings something a bit more daring to the mainstream.

WHEN WE ALL FALL ASLEEP, WHERE DO WE GO? Is a mostly well executed debut for a very exciting young artist who could easily go on to be something truly transformative for pop music.

6/10

AMAZON LINK: https://amzn.to/2UbiiiB

Advertisements