JPEGMAFIA’s Third LP is His Best and Most Daring to Date

All My Heroes Are Cornballs is a powerful and disorienting LP and an exciting addition to one of the best catalogs in the game.

JPEGMAFIA is a hip-hop artist from New York City. His debut LP, Black Ben Carson released in 2016 to critical acclaim and was quickly followed by a collaborative effort with fellow Baltimore artist, Freaky, entitled The Second Amendment. Peggy immediately became a staple of the buzzing experimental hip-hop scene and, with his 2018 LP Veteran, he established himself as one of the most formidable forces in that movement. Now, just over a year later, Peggy returns with one of the most daring projects I’ve heard in years, All My Heroes Are Cornballs.

Without a doubt, this is the most experimental record in Peggy’s catalog, and that’s clear across nearly every second of the LP. Certainly the most experimental moments come on shorter interludes like “JPEGMAFIA TYPE BEAT,” or the later “BUTTERMILK JESUS TYPE BEAT.” These short moments are bursts of near chaos which do stand out, but the entirety of the LP is laced with explosive periods of noise, but these are balanced against tracks like “Life’s Hard, Here’s A Song About Sorrel,” which are so sparse and disconnected that it seems the album could easily just fall to silence at any moments.

JPEG is at his best here when he finds a way to mix these two tendencies. On cuts like “PTSD,” and “Prone!,” he dynamically bounces from calm, grooving moments into overwhelming madness and back again. Often, the album seems just one strange sound away from falling apart before catchy hook or commanding flow pulls it back into reality. The disconnect and lack of concern for traditional structure is jarring to say the least.

Because of these constant switches, the record is almost perfectly paced. Even later tracks like “DOTS FREESTYLE REMIX,” and the closer “Papi I Missed You,” feel exciting and interesting. There’s never a moment that seems to drag or run long and, in fact, at times it feels almost a bit too fast despite the near 50 minute runtime. 

Large portions of this album, though, are fairly low-key and atmospheric. Tracks like “Beta Male Strategies,” achieve this with creative instrumentals and simple melodies. On the other hand, tracks like “Free the Frail,” or the title track build their atmosphere with a wide array of soundbites and spoken sections which are genuinely fascinating. The entire LP is covered in these well placed sound bites with everything from a dinner order at a drive through to a young girl joking about a “weed song.” It builds a world around the listener that you can’t help but want to sit in for a long time.

On the other hand, there are a handful of accessible and well written hooks. Take a cut like the opener, “Jesus Forgive Me, I Am A Thot,” or the later, equally well named “Grimy Waifu.” Here, JPEG’s ear for melody comes through with killer sung hooks which, though they often don’t repeat or stay around for long, leave a lasting effect on the listener.

Beyond this, his vocal performance is simply excellent. This is true for well-sung lines on “Kenan Vs. Kel,” as well as the bombastic flow on “Thot Tactics.” It’s also true in terms of the hilarious lyrics and professional wrestling references on tracks like “Rap Grow Old & Die x No Child Left Behind,” or “Post Verified Lifestyle.” Peggy brings an intensity and a dynamic range on this record that is just intoxicating. It may take a couple listens to even notice the strong instrumentals or production as JPEG’s lead steals the spotlight at every opportunity.

All of this is helmed wonderfully by Peggy’s wonderful production. Throughout the LP, he mixes muted percussion with explosive synths, plays with peaking and cut-outs, and crafts a near disorienting project by stacking layers of raw sound and pealing them back to reveal simple, minimalistic soundscapes. Tracks like “BBW,” and his cover of  TLC’s “No Scrubs,” which is entitled “BasicBitchTearGas,” stand out, but this is the case across the album.

All in all, this is a fantastic album. Peggy’s punk influences and carefree style is distilled into a daring collection of tracks which range wildly from white hot chaos to smooth, atmospheric beats, often within the same song. For my money, this album surpasses earlier works like Veteran and sees JPEG finding his niche in a brilliant way.

All My Heroes Are Cornballs is a powerful and disorienting LP and an exciting addition to one of the best catalogs in the game.

9/10

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Tyler, The Creator Drops Daring Sixth LP

IGOR is a bold and well executed entry into one of the most excited discographies in modern hip-hop.

Tyler, The Creator is a rapper and producer from Ladera Heights, California. He debuted in 2009 with the Bastard mixtape which found impressive success, followed by 2011’s Goblin, which made Tyler a household name and landed in the top five on Billboard. During this early portion of his career, Tyler founded the Odd Future rap collective which spawned the careers of multiple stars in today’s alternative hip-hop scene. He went on to drop Wolf and Cherry Bomb, both of which sold quite well. However, after four successful LP’s, his brash, bass-heavy style was beginning to fatigue many listeners. This changed with 2017’s Flower Boy which brought an entirely new sound to Tyler’s discography along with genuinely heartfelt lyrics which dealt with lover, maturity, and coming to terms with his sexuality. Now, two years later, his much anticipated sixth album, IGOR has arrived.

From the first moments of the opener, “IGOR’S THEME,” the daring and unique production style of this record is immediately apparent. Throughout the song, virtually every mixing decision is surprising and unpredictable, particularly the contrast between the organic drums and the very industrial melodies. This is even more noticeable on a cut like “NEW MAGIC WAND,” which boosts a rattling bass and distorted sound effects to all but bury the soft, genuine vocals which cary the lead from behind. Consistently, Tyler chooses to bury excellent melodies as gems to be found on repeat listens while blasting some of the most commanding elements to the forefront.

In addition to the production, the instrumental pallet itself is shockingly broad and creative. “I THINK,” and the closer, “ARE WE STILL FRIENDS?” uses a wide range of interesting synths and percussion instruments to bring an almost mind-bending sound to life. On the other hand, a later cut like “GONE, GONE/THANK YOU,” utilizes everything from wispy acoustic guitars and guttural basses to bizarre vocal effects and oddly bright shakers and snares. Nearly every track is an adventure as we’re never quite given the boundaries for where Tyler is willing to go. Instead, each song feels like a perpetual experiment.

Beyond this, the album’s strongest quality is its tendency to drop into some of the most danceable grooves of the year. Tracks like the massive hit, “EARFQUAKE,” or the equally fantastic, “A BOY IS A GUN,” feature excellent, ear worm choruses which blend perfectly between the modern sensibilities of hip-hop music and a sort of synthetic, industrial Motown style which seems entirely unique to this album.

While this is certainly not the measured, balanced, and well-developed style one would generally associate with good pacing, IGOR instead aims to incapsulate Tyler’s manic energy and does so perfectly. Songs like “RUNNING OUT OF TIME,” and “I DON’T LOVE YOU ANYMORE” are perhaps the best examples of this, though it’s apparent throughout. Each track seems to bounce endlessly from one creative idea to another, expecting the listener to fill in the blanks to connect them. Through this, the project keeps you inthralled for its full runtime.

Another trick which helps the pacing as well as the songwriting to punch above its weight is Tyler’s tendency to write in parts instead of traditional choruses and verses. Take tracks like “PUPPET,” and “WHAT’S GOOD,” for example, where the entire makeup of the song seems to come unglued and reform every few moments, shifting wildly from heavy hitting bars to flowing grooves and everything in between. Again, the manic energy of the album’s writer bleeds through every note, making every cut a loosely tethered amalgamation of contrary ideas.

Ultimately, I’m left with very few complaints. The album’s loose concept is a bit difficult to follow, but its largely irrelevant and overshadowed by more than a few incredible songs. Mostly, I feel admiration for Tyler, himself. With his early work facing quite a bit of criticism for its abrasive and at times sparse tone, he could easily have retreated into a safer form of mainstream hip-hop. Instead, he stuck to his guns and now comes out the other side having crafted a truly unique sound which is a clear advancement of the sound on the earlier records.

IGOR is a bold and well executed entry into one of the most excited discographies in modern hip-hop.

8/10

Young Socrates Drops Heady, Experimental Debut EP

Kill the Gods isn’t perfect, but it’s quite fascinating and a strong first entry to the Young Socrates catalog.

Young Socrates is a 20-year-old alternative hip-hop artist, producer and mixing engineer From Lagos, Nigeria and based in Murfreesboro, TN. He’s made something of a name for himself with a series of Soundcloud releases over the last year. He’s notable for heavily industrial production, an experimental mixing style, and lyrics with heavy philosophical and absurdist themes. Following some success from lead singles, Kill the Gods was released last week and it’s quite an experience.

The record opens with what is perhaps my favorite cut, “Slow Victim.” The instrumental intro clocks in just under two minutes, but captures a fascinating style in such a short time. The repetitive percussion and electronic sound pallet is immediately gripping, and the continued additions of layer after layer build to a cacophonous fever pitch. The track is at once fascinating, yet alienating, and it sets a strong tone for the rest of the project.

The title track follows with a slightly softer pallet and introduces Socrates’ vocals quite well. The odd time signature and lack of overall structure makes the track fairly unpredictable, and the short runtime insures that the listener never does quite catch up. That being said, the lyrics are introspective and draw an interesting and quite informed link to the work of Absurdist legend Albert Camus by treating the mundanity of everyday as a hell in of itself.

“The Light,” begins with a uniquely organic sound, featuring an intriguing bass riff and a soft, but somewhat lifeless piano lead. The vocal performance is a bit hard to grasp, but tonally, it works quite well. The soulless, almost 8-bit sound effects which perform the hook are an excellent touch, and it’s this blend of the recognizable and comforting with the lifeless and at times disorienting which characterizes what is so impressive about this project.

The EP’s most popular single, “Devil in the Streets,” falls fourth, and it’s a much more straightforward cut than previous tracks. Lyrically, this is clear and away the highlight of tracklist, with Socrates’ biting critique of religion coming through in every line, though cut with a healthy dose of absurdism in its refusal to provide serious solutions. The percussion is also at its best here, with a sharp snare slicing the mix in half during the verse. These qualities combined with yet another odd structure and short runtime make for one of the best tracks on the record.

“Old Jargon,” is the closer and by far the longest cut in the list. Because of this, the lyrics are far more sprawling and, while a bit unfocused, center on the same themes of religious criticism and Absurdism. The instrumental gets a bit repetitive, but the synths are well performed and abrasive guitar lines are excellent. Ultimately, it’s a strong finish to an excellent project.

All my praise of this EP notwithstanding, I am left with a few minor criticisms. A few of the instrumentals, while well mixed and produced, could use more variety. If each track had carried the intensity of the opener, or explored some more adventurous sonic ideas, this could’ve been solved. Additionally, Socrates’ flow could do with a bit more range. Though his rhyme schemes are impressive and entertaining, the lack of unique delivery on each track masks a lot of the work that went into the lyricism.

Ultimately, however, Kill the Gods is fantastic! Lyrically, the intentional and well written inclusion of heavily philosophical themes is quite an accomplishment, made all the more noticeable by a perfectly cohesive tone in each track. It’s well written, daring, and often bewildering upon the first few listens.

Kill the Gods isn’t perfect, but it’s quite fascinating and a strong first entry to the Young Socrates catalog.

4/5

AMAZON LINK: https://amzn.to/2UbiiiB

Blackstar: David Bowie’s Under Appreciated Final Masterpiece

David Bowie has been gone for three years now, and as he said so beautifully so many years ago, “the stars look very different today.”

The year was 2015 and David Bowie, at the age of 68. was dying. Few outside of his family and close friends knew this, but he’d been diagnosed with cancer of the liver and the future wasn’t looking bright.

Bowie was as close to God-like status as one can be without being either a Beatle or Elvis. From his time has The Thin White Duke, to iconic tracks like “Space Oddity,” to his many concept albums and rock operas, most of which were written and performed in an array of strange characters, David had pushed the boundaries of rock music and music and general for his entire life and with 25 studio albums, five of them platinum in the US and nine platinum in the UK, he’s one of the most successful artists that ever lived.

On his 69th birthday, just two days before his death, Bowie released what is likely his darkest and most haunting artistic statement of his or any other career, his 25th LP, Blackstar. On it, Bowie deals in topics of death, mysticism, mortality, and the afterlife. The true artist he was, David Bowie had spent his final days writing and recording one last project, which he lived just long enough to see brought into the world. While the main thrust of this piece is to show you why you absolute must hear the record, it’s worth discussing why it hasn’t been as widely discussed as it should be.

The most obvious reason is that the record is far from accessible. Most of the instrumentation is made up a very dense and crushing form of Jazz and Bowie’s vocal melodies and lyrics are experimental to say the least. However, I’d say that there was another cause which weighed much heavier. Namely, Bowie’s death itself.

When a star of that magnitude passes away, fans often go back to classic releases to relive the golden days, and that caused many fans to ignore Blackstar. On top of that, the record itself is so dark and deals so heavily in death and mortality that it doesn’t allow listeners to escape to a time when Bowie was on top of the world again, but instead refuses to turn away from his death. All this being said, it’s long past time that Blackstar gets the respect it deserves.

Firstly, the record is instrumentally fascinating. Partnering with a litany of accomplished jazz artists with a flare for the experimental, Bowie created a project which is equal parts dense and dark. From the circling drums and staccato saxophones to the cacophonous backing vocals and the tasteful but jarring electronic elements, Blackstar rarely touches down on earth. Instead, it’s a orbits about, vaguely recognizable but never predictable.

This is, of course, before we touch on David’s performance itself which is simply breathtaking. His voice finds the perfect mix between power and sincerity and it’s generally our only tether to the real world, sonically. There are more than a few moments which could easily move a longtime fan to tears, even after multiple listens, either in his ability to honestly portray his own frailty or in the moments when everything comes together and just for one short moment, he’s back to his full glory.

The record’s best asset, without a doubt, is Bowie’s lyrics. There is just something indescribable about hearing one of the greatest artists that ever lived so unflinching facing his own demise. On Lazarus, Bowie details his own visualization of his walk into the afterlife beginning with the line, “look up here, I’m in heaven! I’ve got scars that can’t be seen.” And, of course, on the opening, nine minute epic of a title track, he essentially writes a soundtrack to his own funeral.

Beyond all of this, the visuals involved with the record are stunning as well. The video for the title track is a psychedelic funeral for Bowie’s iconic Major Tom character from “Space Oddity” while the bizarre and at times frightening video for “Lazarus,” was packed with clues to his approaching demise long before his disease was known to the public.

Ultimately, the question is this: why should you listen to Blackstar? Why not remember Bowie as the almighty Ziggy Stardust and move on?  There are a few answers to this. The first is that Bowie intended this record to be his swan song and it should be treated as such. He spent his final moments creating this work of art and it should be respected by fans for what it’s meant to be.

That being said, there’s an even more important reason to visit this album which stands beyond just David Bowie himself. The fact is, there’s never been an album like Blackstar and there may never be again. To hear one of our greatest, an icon, and a truly brilliant artist confront death in its most real and inescapable form and he could think only of one thing, his music.

Blackstar is brave not only for the superficial reasons of it’s wide pallet and bizarre structures, but it is brave in the truest sense of staring death itself in the eyes, staring it down, and using your final breath to sing about what you see.

David Bowie has been gone for three years now, and as he said so beautifully so many years ago, “the stars look very different today.”

AMAZON LINK: https://amzn.to/2UbiiiB

The George Washing Machines Drop Brutal and Daring EP

Overall, FUNERAL CRACK BINGE is one of the more daring and brutal projects I’ve heard this year, and while it’s certainly not for everyone, it’s a must hear if who wish to explore the fringes of underground music.
**TW: Bad Language**

The George Washing Machines is the experiment grindcore/doom metal alter ego of Jack Simpson. Created in 2012 in Washington, D.C., with the explicit goal of creating “the worst band of all time,” the outfit dropped a large collection of about 22 singles before falling off the map as Simpson shifted toward EDM music. Six years later, after the death of a close personal friend, Jack reignited GWM as an outlet to deal with depression while dabbling in experimental writing styles like taking quotes from a former crack addict or directly reciting a breakup letter written to an ex-girlfriend. Now much more mature and with a wide array of fascinating influences, the George Washing Machines has dropped FUNERAL CRACK BINGE.

The record opens with the hilariously titled “ANTHONY FANTANO WOULD PROBABLY GIVE THIS RECORD LIKE A 6.3,” which, itself, begins with a long and angry statement claiming that this is “not music.” The track that follows is a hellish, doom metal-inspired cut that is one of the better openers I’ve heard all year. This is the first of many points on the EP in which the drumming is excellent, but the brutally distorted guitars are actually the highlight for me here, aided by the periodically disorienting feedbacks.

It’s followed by “BITCH GET THE FUCK OUT OF MY HOUSE,” which is a real freight train of a song. There’s a much heavier thrash and grindcore element as the fuzzy guitars chug along at a much faster tempo and the drums are driving and explosive. The vocals are quite impressive here, despite having no lyrics aside from repeating the title, bringing a gravelly quality that really adds to the track. The highlight, without a doubt, is the bizarre and abrasive breakdown that leads into the final chorus. While the electronic elements are fairly scarce across the EP, they add quite a bit to this song.

The best of the six tracks, “A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND,” comes next, and it’s here where Simpson finds a sound that this fairly unique to him. With heavy influences from post-punk and hardcore, this track turns out to be certainly the most accessible on the project, though that isn’t saying much. The drums are excellent on this cut, as are the vocals, and the balance struck between crushing instrumentation and singable melody is truly something to be proud of.

We seem to take a left turn to hell immediately after, however, with the title track, “FUNERAL CRACK BINGE.” This is one of the more brutal and caustic songs I’ve heard in quite some time, from the screeching loops to the pummeling screams and the almost reptilian effects of the outro. It’s a lush hellscape that should satisfy fans of the group’s earlier sound.

The post-punk returns, however, on “ANNA, PLEASE DON’T MOVE TO PORTLAND WITH JAKE.” The quick switches from heavy but accessible verses to genuinely horrifying choruses are jarring in the best way possible. There’s a desperation conveyed very well in the lead vocals and the guitars are gut wrenching on the choruses. Once again, the drums shine as being extremely well played and arranged, and it makes for yet another fantastic track.

We close out with “I MEAN I GUESS WE CAN FUCK IF YOU WANT TO…” and it’s here where I will find my first substantive complaint as the more electronic, industrial style of this track makes it feel quite out of place in the lineup. That being said, it is a great song. The loops are extremely well utilized, the rapping from Young Socrates is phenomenal and jam packed with emotional delivery, and the ending may be the best on the record. Though it does feel a bit out of place here, it does give hope that future releases could tend toward more electronic, Death Grips inspired tone.

While my complaints are minor, I do have a few, most of them stemming from the production side. First and foremost, the drums. While they’re perfectly performed, they seem to have been left almost bare in terms of EQ and could do with a bit of touching up. Additionally, the there is a pervasive static across the record, which likely comes from the several higher pitched cymbals and the near constant overdrive on guitars and vocals. Having a constant amount of noise is, of course, not a bad thing on a noise rock record, but much of this seems to come from nowhere, and could likely be fixed with a bit tighter EQ on the instruments. All of this, however, is fairly forgivable, considering the EP’s DIY style.

Overall, FUNERAL CRACK BINGE is one of the more daring and brutal projects I’ve heard this year, and while it’s certainly not for everyone, it’s a must hear if who wish to explore the fringes of underground music.

4/5

HOMESHAKE’s Fourth LP is Full of Ambition but Lacking Ideas

Helium may be a promising sign for the future, but in the present, it’s hardly worth a second glance.

HOMESHAKE is a lo-fi, indie pop singer/songwriter from Montreal, Quebec. He debuted in 2013 with two mixtapes, The Homeshake Tape and Dynamic Meditation. He gained something of an underground following which eventually lead to his departure from Mac DeMarco’s band in 2014 and the release of his debut LP, In The Shower. His follow up, Midnight Snack came about a year later followed by Fresh Air in 2017. Over the years, he’s transitioned from a slightly indie-tinged, guitar pop act to a more lo-fi experimental project. Helium is his latest effort, and it leaves quite a bit to be desired.

The album does have quite a bit going for it, not the least of which is ambition. The Seinfeld-esque bass guitar on “Like Mariah,” is a creative touch and “Other Than,” utilizes an interesting siren loop which fades in and out across the entirety of the track. There are plenty of moments like this, where HOMESHAKE seems to have the ambition needed to experiment with a large pallet, and though they don’t always work all that well, it’s fun to hear him try new things.

There are even a few genuinely well put together cuts on Helium. “All Night Long,” is an enjoyable, lo-fi track that features some great, subtle instrumentation. On the other hand, “Just Like My,” and “Nothing Could Be Better,” range from shimmering to ethereal, each full of strong creative decisions and set to fun grooves.

There are even a couple impressive interludes. “Heartburn” is relaxed and features a pleasing roll of wind chimes, while the most daring piece on the record comes in the form of the 90-second, “Salu Says Hi.” The chaotic spoken pieces drape over the droning instrumental well and the bouncing effects near the end are quite intriguing. Unfortunately, it’s on the topic of interludes where we find our first issue.

It should stated that there are far too many of these short instrumentals between tracks, and several of them seem either to be padding the runtime or like they’d fit better as intros to the next track. Beyond this, the opener, “Early,” for example, is just plain boring, with almost nothing happening for the entire 90 seconds.

Boring is a term that applies to much of this album. “Anything At All,” and the closer, “(Secret Track),” are perhaps the worst offenders as their entire runtime seems completely devoid of ideas. One great quality of electronic and lo-fi music is the many subtle layers, each with its own progression, leaving much to be uncovered on repeat listens. Much of Helium however, seems to be the absolute bare minimum, with little thought put into the melodies or especially the underpinning pieces.

In addition, The vocal performances are most just passable at best and frustrating at worst. “Another Thing,” for example, has some of the worst vocals on the album. Some of this may have worked the vocals had been heavily produced and used as another element, not the focus, but with a relatively dry lead, the shortcomings just can’t be ignored.

Worst of all, though, is HOMESHAKE’s insistance on repetitive sound effects, worst of all, the static. Several tracks are saddled with this backing static, though the “Trudi and Lou,” interlude and “Couch Cushion,” spring to mind as especially egregious examples where one, bland static is played behind the entire track. Something like waves on the ocean may have done this slightly better as at least there is some variance, but this static is omnipresent in the mix and absolutely lifeless.

As the album wraps up, I can’t help but feel a bit disappointed. While I’ve never been massively invested in HOMESHAKE’s work, Helium did seem to be striking on a vein that could yield very unique and interesting results. Unfortunately, he stops short and only delivers a surface level collection lo-fi wallpaper with only the hint of further depth.

Helium may be a promising sign for the future, but in the present, it’s hardly worth a second glance.

3/10

AMAZON LINK: https://amzn.to/2NhfRbU

Xiu Xiu’s Newest Release is Hellish and Fascinating

Girl with Basket of Fruit is certainly not for the faint of heart, but if you can brave this hellscape of an album, the reward is well worth your time.

Xiu Xiu is an American experimental rock outfit from San Jose, California. They debuted in 2002 with Knife Play and have gone on to release 13 studio albums with rarely a year going by without a Xiu Xiu release. Few have charted, though their Record Store Day special, Xiu Xiu Plays the Music of Twin Peaks hit number nine on the US heat charts. By and large, their work has been largely underground, though they’ve built a respectable cult fan base. David Espinoza compared their sound to a mixture of Robert Smith and Trent Reznor while Pitchfork noted a “continual poetic and romantic beauty,” in their lyricism.

Sonically, Xiu Xiu is hard to place, not the least because each of their albums vary widely in style and influence. The majority of their work can largely be placed under umbrella groupings like industrial rock, noise pop, and experimental psych, each of which do describe some aspect of what’s happening on a Xiu Xiu record. Most importantly, their manic energy, massive pallet, and disregard for traditional rules of music make for an unpredictable and unique experience. Girl With Basket of Fruit is their most recent effort and it’s the darkest and most crushing to date.

From the first moments of the album, it’s pummeling and horrific soundscape becomes extremely clear. The opener and title track features abrasive loops of electronic instrumentation at a breakneck tempo while “Pumpkin Attack on Mommy and Daddy” sounds like a soundtrack to a hellish rave with grating, high pitched tones setting a quick pace which melts away into bizarre breakdowns that will likely sound alien to even the most dedicated fans of experimental music.

There are clear looks to the past of experimental music with tracks like “It Comes Out as a Joke,” utilizing the kind of manic chaos that characterized the most insane works of artists like Captain Beefheart and Jim Morrison. Meanwhile, “The Wrong Thing,” is reminiscent of the haunting, experimental jazz works of David Bowie’s final releases.

On the other hand, the sound pallet of this album contains a fascinating duality between past and future. Take a song like “Ice Cream Truck,” for example, where futuristic lasers and hisses are intercut with guttural growls from unknown creatures, only to dissolve into a dancing baseline played on upright bass, the recording of which is left almost raw. “Scisssssssors,” on the other hand, mixes a rolling collection of latin-inspired drums and a few chilling screams with synth squeals and low, rumbling buzzes. This imbalance is fascinating and contributes to the overall sense of unease this album creates.

This sense is made far stronger by some of the most unnerving lyrics in recent memory. “Amargi ve Moo,” seem to be written by a man so unhinged from reality that he speaks on of horrendous ideas with a poetic beauty which permeates even his descriptions of collecting tumors and beheading saints. On the other hand, “Mary Turner Mary Turner,” recounts the true story of the appalling murder and forced abortion of a Southern black woman in the early 20th century with such unbridled honestly that I’ve genuinely never been more disturbed by a piece of writing.

As excellent as the album is, it seems to stumble just a bit at the finish line. The closer, “Normal Love,” has a lot going for it, namely intriguing vocal performances and well written lyrics, but the relatively simple chord progression and many of the more cliched vocal ad libs in the background completely kill the momentum of the record thus far. The song also lacks some of the cohesion that made earlier cuts so fantastic.

Regardless, Girl with Basket of Fruit is absolutely incredible. Every second of the project is daring and spellbinding. It reaches some of the darkest lyrical places I’ve ever heard a record go,  and it gets there with mind-boggling instrumentation and production.

Girl with Basket of Fruit is certainly not for the faint of heart, but if you can brave this hellscape of an album, the reward is well worth your time.

9/10

Amazon Link: https://amzn.to/2X8UrSM