Every Richard Edwards Album Ranked!!

This one took me awhile, but it’s finally done! Here’s my ranking of every album in the discography of one of my favorite artists of all time!

10. Sling Shot To HeavenMargot and the Nuclear So & So’s (2014)

A longtime favorite of many Margot fans and of Richard himself, I generally find myself far less impressed. To be clear, it is quite an accomplishment. The songwriting is the best it’s been since their debut, the instrumentation is simple and spacey, and the harmonies are air tight. Unfortunately, the follow up, Tell Me More About Evil is comprised of nearly all the same tracks and, for my money, matches all the highlights of Sling Shot while surpassing it in several areas.

That being said, the album has no shortage of bright spots. “Long Legged Blonde Memphis,” channels the group’s blues influences well while “Wedding Song,” is a gorgeously vulnerable and well written. The instrumental on “Los Angeles,” actually adds quite a bit to the track and the overall spacious aesthetic makes the album feel fairly cohesive. I certainly see the appeal of this record, but in terms of the larger catalog, it has very little to offer.

9. BuzzardMargot and the Nuclear So & So’s (2010)

Margot’s first foray into the heavier, garage rock styles which would characterize the latter half of their catalog, Buzzard is an interesting piece of music. Lyrically, Richard’s mix of quirky and thoughtful is as balanced as ever, though much of his writing takes him to a darker place than previous efforts. The big changes come in the instrumentals which are often heavily distorted, though still just as well performed.

The album’s opener, “Birds,” is a favorite among Margot fans for its unique lyrics and manic energy, but I find myself equally impressed by tracks like the gloomy, distorted “Will You Love Me Forever?” There are still moments like “Tiny Vampire Robot,” and “Lunatic, Lunatic, Lunatic,” which call back to the earlier, more intimate sound, and the record seems to struggle with committing to the new style, somewhat to its detriment.

8. Animal!Margot and the Nuclear So & So’s (2008)

This record is very often ignored by casual listeners and that’s a shame considering what the band went through just to put it out. Long story short, Epic Records had chosen a tracklist, which would become Not Animal, for Margot’s second studio release. The band themselves, however, insisted on the tracklist which would become Animal! Arguments ensued and finally a drunk Richard Edwards threatened to leak the album online if the studio didn’t let them release both. And so, we have Animal! And Not Animal.

While, philosophically, I side with the artist on such an issue, the critical side of me is well aware that this is the inferior release. There are bright moments. “Hello, Vagina,” shines much more here thanks to its earlier appearance. Additionally, there are more bizarre cuts like “Mariel’s Brazen Overture,” which are a treat for long time listeners. Ultimately, Not Animal is the superior project, but Animal! Is exactly the kind of deep cut that’s worth a listen for true fans.

7. Rot Gut, DomesticMargot and the Nuclear So & So’s (2012)

From the opening moments, if the title and cover didn’t give it away, it’s clear that this is heaviest entry to Margot’s catalog, and for the most part, that works in its favor. While I much prefer the more folksy sound on earlier projects, I can appreciated the skillful guitar work and explosive nature of Rot Gut. Additionally, Richard’s voice makes the transition to garage rock quite well, with several powerful moments.

There are a few call backs to the earlier sound like the carefree comedy of “A Journalist Falls in Love with Death Row Inmate #16,” but the best moments come in the pure chaos of cuts like “The Devil,” and “Disease Tobacco Free.” “Frank Left,” is a lyrical highlight to be sure, though the album is somewhat lacking in the respect, and the psychedelic, piano driven closer “Christ,” is one of the record’s best tracks. It’s not my favorite, but if you enjoy Margot’s heavier side, Rot Gut is the best it gets.

6. Pity Party!Richard Edwards  (2017)

The second acoustic only album in Richard’s catalog, I struggled with whether to include this album as there’s very little original music and it only received a very limited vinyl release with nothing available over digital platforms. That being said, it’s absolutely fantastic and another fan favorite which earned it a slot on the list.  The tracklist is made up of acoustic, one-take versions of tracks from both LCCS and the then unreleased Verdugo.

The updates on older cuts like “When You’re Gone,” are welcome surprises with Richard’s very different voice acting as something of an unintentional commentary on the many years since their release. The relaxed, unproduced style also adds quite a bit to tracks like “Postcard,” and “Git Paid,” that didn’t quite shine through and get the attention they deserved on their more official releases. Overall, this is a record for the fans without a doubt, but I’m one of those fans and as such, I love it.

5. Lemon Cotton Candy SunsetRichard Edwards (2017)

While a three year hiatus is not all that long in the music world, Richard’s was certainly felt by his fans, particularly because we didn’t know that we’d get any more music. Finally, a long post was made on Instagram explaining the long silence and the struggles he’d been facing which ended with the hope that the forthcoming project would sound like “being lost at sea.” That it does.

Richard runs the gamut of emotions on this LP, from the hope that bleeds from every chord on “Little Dead Eye-d,” to the unfocused anger on “Disappeared Planets.” His catchy melodies are back in spades on tracks like “Rollin’, Rollin’, Rollin’,” and the best track, “Pornographic Teens.” Perhaps most importantly, he differentiates his new sound from that of his previous group’s with tracks like “Sister Wives,” and “Moonwrapped,” which lay the groundwork for the kind of orchestral folk style which would be fleshed out more on LCCS’ sister album. It was a beautiful return for a beloved artist.

4. Tell Me More About EvilMargot and the Nuclear So & So’s (2014)

Often wholly ignored by more casual fans, this is one my absolute favorite Richard Edwards efforts. Created as a final release before Margot disbanded, TMMAE is a collection of roughly recorded acoustic versions of earlier tracks, most of which come from the previous release, Slingshot to Heaven. It was recorded as a soundtrack for an 8mm film shot by Richard himself which is nearly as beautiful as the record itself.

Virtually every track on this album is wonderful, but I could choose a few favorites. The harmonies on “Hello, San Franciso,” are tight and warm, the guitar work on “Flying Saucer Blues,” is melodic and catchy, and the lyrics to tracks like “Lazy,” and “Gettin’ Fat,” are some of Richard’s funniest. The best cut on the record is “Bleary-Eyed Blue,” which may easily be my favorite track of his entire career. The album can seem a bit slowly and dreary to some, but to fans of the group, the intimacy of a record that makes you feel like you’re sitting right there with the band is invaluable.

3. VerdugoRichard Edwards (2018)

The tenth and most recent addition to the discography thus far, Verdugo is the much stronger sequel to Lemon Cotton Candy Sunset. The tight, ten track playlist is perfectly paced with a new and enjoyable surprise waiting around every corner. The orchestral elements which were lightly experimented with on LCCS decorate virtually every second of Verdugo, aided by fantastic production and a uniquely vintage aesthetic.

The quiet simplicity of “Something Wicked,” is starkly gorgeous, while the lush chaos of “Minefield,” is almost overwhelming. His ear for melody is as strong as ever on a cut like “Olive Oyl,” and “Gene,” is one of the best lyrical moments in his career. Possibly the best track is the closer, “Pornographic Teens,” appearing for the third time on a Richard Edwards album, this time in its best form. With nine albums under his belt, Richard went out of his way to craft something completely knew and creative that has me absolutely ecstatic for whatever is coming next.

2. The Dust of RetreatMargot and the Nuclear So & So’s (2006)

Margot’s mid-2000’s debut is quite the start for the indie-rock collective. The record is fantastically paced and presents a unique, developed sound from the start. The lyricism is excellent, the instrumentation is quirky, and the production is surprisingly well done for a debut album. This early period of Margot’s career has a strong folk-rock tilt which limits their potential to some extent, but nevertheless, Dust has some of the group’s best tracks.

The melodies on tracks like “On a Freezing Chicago Street,” and “Talking in Code,” are absolutely fantastic. Lyrically, tracks like “Skeleton Key,” and “Dress Me Like a Clown,” are extremely impressive. The album’s highlight, for me, is “Jen is Bringing the Drugs,” which serves as an early precursor to the intimate, heartfelt works that would come to characterize Margot’s later efforts. The Dust of Retreat is far from perfect, but it stands as a very impressive debut.

1. Not AnimalMargot and the Nuclear So & So’s (2008)

The other half of the aforementioned battle with studio executives, Not Animal is the version of this album that Margot would rather not have put out. As I said before, however, the studio’s list is much superior. The last Margot project to lean heavier on the folk side of folk-rock, Not Animal keeps everything that worked on Dust of Retreat and improves upon it for a finished product that’s simply gorgeous and one of my favorite records of all time.

There’s so much to love here. The anthemic choruses of “German Motor Car,” will have listeners singing along instantly, while the wider pallet and intimate recording of “As Tall As Cliffs,” radiates the fun the band is clearly having working as a collective. “Holy Cow!” Is a sweet but emotional cut and “Children’s Crusade on Acid,” is bold and experimental. Easily the highlight, however, is the band’s biggest hit to date by a mile, “Broadripple is Burning.” Not Animal is gorgeously written and performed and an absolute blast to listen to. A few of their later efforts may be more technically impressive, but for me, this the best iteration of Margot and the best album in Richard’s long career.

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Andrew Bird’s 12th LP is a Listenable Piece of Folk Rock

My Finest Work Yet is a moderately enjoyable album that could’ve benefitted from having a few more cooks in the kitchen.

Andrew Bird is an indie-rock vocalist and multi-instrumentalist from Lake Forest, Illinois. He debuted as a solo artist with 2003’s Weather Systems, after leaving the band Bowl of Fire, with whom he’d spent most of the mid to late 90’s. His early work found some following, particularly with fans of the band, but after signing with Fat Possum Records, he dropped 2007’s Armchair Apochrypha, his first solo effort to chart on the Billboard 200.  He went on top the US Folk charts twice, first with 2012’s Break It Yourself, and again with 2016’s Are You Serious. With a long career which winds through a multitude of styles, labels, and albums, Bird has become a favorite of folk-rock fans thanks to a consistent output and creative style. This week, he’s released his 12th album, ambitiously titled My Finest Work Yet.

Immediately, Bird’s experience as a songwriter is obvious in the many unique chord progressions he uses. Tracks like the opener, “Sisyphus,” and the album’s strongest cut, “Proxy War,” are fairly unpredictable and the inventive progressions allow for a few unique vocal melodies as well. It’s easily the strongest point of Bird’s songwriting on this album.

Vocally, he’s quite strong as well. On “Olympians,” he seamlessly transitions from driving, simple verses to large howling choruses, executing each with quite a bit of power and support. With “Archipelago,” on the other hand, he sells a relatively run-of-the-mill track with a dynamic mix of sweet falsettos a riveting strength. Andrew has never been renowned as a particularly remarkable vocalist, but for the majority of this albums he gives quite strong performances that elevate even the less impressive songs.

Maybe the strongest piece of this puzzle, however, is his skill as an instrumentalist. He is best known as a strong violinist, and he exhibits this many times on the record, including an excellent solo on “Don the Struggle,” which leaves me wishing each track had contained such a solo. He’s also noted, in the album’s credits, for his whistling, which is admittedly fantastic! On “Manifest,” for example, he whistles an excellent melody which adds quite a bit to the track.

On the subject of lyrics, unfortunately, My Finest Work Yet stands on shaky ground. There are wonderful moments like early cut, “Bloodless,” which draws much inspiration from the Spanish Civil War in 1936. On the other hand, there’s a handful of pretentious and overall meaningless lyrics all over the album. “Cracking Codes,” and the closer, “Bellevue Bridge Club,” are the worst offenders on this front, packed full of words which say very little.

Another complaint which has dogged this LP since the release of its first singles is just how far out on his sleeve Andrew wears his influences. “Sisyphus,” though enjoyable, could sneak perfectly into any Father John Misty album, which “Olympians,” pulls heavily from early Springsteen efforts. Additionally, “Archipelago,” and “Proxy War,” bare striking resemblance to the work of the Beatles. It isn’t so egregious as to make these tracks unlistenable, and if Andrew were a younger songwriter, I could easily forgive this, but at this stage in his career, it’s frustrating to hear such lack of originality.

The worst offense, without a doubt, is the production, which Bird did himself. Nearly every one of the 10 songs is muddy, lifeless, and flat. Additionally, he seems to have no care for the different tones needed for each track. “Bloodless,” for example, is billed as some mysterious jazz piece, but the instruments are so brightly mixed that all intrigue is gone. The album’s worst track, “Fallorun,” is a jumbled mess which is made infinitely worse by the way each instrument bleeds into one another. This record would have benefitted from a more expert touch behind the board.

Ultimately, My Finest Work Yet is certainly enjoyable. For fans of the growing folk-rock movement, this is a fine listen to hold you over until the next Father John Misty or Fleet Foxes release, but it could’ve been much more. Andrew’s songwriting and instrumental abilities set this album up with a ton of potential, but poor production, a lack of originality, and a very mixed bag of lyrics hold it back.

My Finest Work Yet is a moderately enjoyable album that could’ve benefitted from having a few more cooks in the kitchen.

5/10

AMAZON LINK: https://amzn.to/2UbiiiB