Takeoff’s Solo Debut is Competent, but Uninventive

The Last Rocket does what it sets out to do quite competently, but the finished product is hardly distinguishable from the piles of trap music on the radio today.

     Takeoff is a rap/hip-hop artist from Atlanta Georgia. He is best known as a member of the massively successful trap trio, Migos, who’s 2017 LP Culture, and it’s lead single, “Bad and Boujee,” turned the hip-hop community on it’s head and ensured several more years for trap music at the top of the rap world. The group has continued their massive success with Culture II and the upcoming Culture III, scheduled for release in early 2019.

   Takeoff’s flow doesn’t particularly stand out from his fellow Migos members, but the group’s style as a whole has been something of a revolution in the rap world. Their bass-heavy, maximalist instrumentals, and triplet-centric flow has become the standard sound for the new wave of trap music. After the success of his group mate, Quavo, Takeoff has decided to branch out with his own LP, The Last Rocket, and it’s exactly what we expected.

   Oddly enough, one highlight of the record is found in the soundbites. The opener, “Martian” begins with an extended clip of an official sounding man counting down to liftoff, and “None To Me,” opens with an older man talking about “the fame, the money, the cars.” In most cases, this is a small point, but adds to the general production quality of the project, which is excellent.

   This production quality really rears its head in a few of the dreamier tracks. “She Gon Wink,” features chimes and an active flute part which are almost as effective as the heavily. Processed vocal line on “Last Memory.” None of these tracks, however, compare the spacious vibes on “Infatuation,” the best track on the LP, which calls back to the 90’s era of R&B with a driving beat, a pulsing synth, and an almost comically smooth, high-pitched lead vocal.

   In many ways, Takeoff even surpassed expectations, particularly with his flow. Starting this record for the first time, I was expecting a constant barrage of triplets with little variety, but I was given a pleasant supply. Particularly on cuts like “Vacation,” and “Insomnia,” Takeoff delivers a hard hitting and dynamic performance, which I wasn’t prepared for. Even on a track like “Bruce Wayne,” his groggy, mumbled flow fits the instrumental quite well. However, he did slip into old habits more than a few times.

   “Lead the Wave,” and “Casper,” are perhaps the most glaring instances of this as they are back to back and feature nearly identical, triplet-heavy flows for the majority of their runtimes. Here I found myself quite disappointed, as I’ve heard this flow of this type of instrumental far too many times, as is. And it’s this very complaint which leads me to my main critique of The Last Rocket.

   Trap music has sat atop the rap zeitgeist for quite sometime at this point, and thus, trap albums begin to face an entirely new round of troubles. Namely, what purpose does your album have for existing? Listen to a track like “Soul Plane,” or “I Remember,” and you’ll see what I mean. This record adds nothing to trap cannon that hasn’t been done better in the past. While Takeoff’s work, as with that of any Migos member, is of a higher quality than the bulk of this scene, but it remains mostly unremarkable in it’s cannon.

   The Last Rocket is a fun listen and it even has a few exciting moments on the first half of the forty minute runtime, but the majority is unnecessary and unmemorable. For a debut LP, the record feels remarkably tired and overdone, leaving little room for a musical future.

   The Last Rocket does what it sets out to do quite competently, but the finished product is hardly distinguishable from the piles of trap music on the radio today.

4/10

HEAR THE LAST ROCKET: https://open.spotify.com/album/5XRCcUfwtLNQflDd9cfz4U