My Top 5 Shows From Sonic Temple 2019!!

Here’s the highlights from a fantastic week of rock n’ roll!!

5. Badflower

After a tiring drive to Ohio and a long wait in line on day one, we found our seats just in time to kick off our weekend with Badflower. The group was one of many up and coming artists on the lineup and easily one of the best. Josh Katz is a fantastic frontman, bringing an infectious energy and powerful vocals to every track. The setlist was predictably packed with cuts from their latest LP, OK, I’M SICK, and when they closed with their recent mega-hit, “Heroin,” after announcing that it had just reached number one on the US rock charts, they felt like a headliner in the making. This was an excellent way to kick off the weekend and a strong showing for a promising young band.

4. Ghost

Leading up to Ghost’s performance, I was admittedly uninformed on the group’s discography, but I was quite familiar with their reputation for theatrical performances. After an extended intermission during which an elaborate stage was assembled, the band of nameless, masked instrumentalists appeared to roaring applause followed by front man, Tobias Forge clad in his newest character, Cardinal Copia. Though I didn’t know the songs nearly as well as other acts from the festival, the energy was simply undeniable. Their music is heavily inspired by golden age acts like Alice Cooper and Black Sabbath and by combining that sound with a dramatic flair and fantastically talented musicians, Ghost has crafted a truly unique experience.

3. Halestorm

Kicking off the top-billed lineup for day one was Halestorm, perhaps best known for their near constant touring over their very long career. That experience pays dividends in massive shows like this as they absolutely brought the house down. The set kicked off with a long drum solo from Arejay Hale and continued at a breakneck pace for its entirety. The setlist was nicely mixed between older classics like “I Miss the Misery,” and newer hits like “Uncomfortable,” which sounded much better in their live settings than on the record. Lizzy Hale’s show-stopping vocals were captivating and, combined with excellent performances from the rest of the band, allowed Halestorm to stand comfortably, toe to toe with the other legends on the bill with them.

2. System of a Down

Heading into this festival, no band had me quite as excited as did System of a Down and they certainly did not disappoint. While the show was somewhat held back by noticeable technical issues, I found myself in awe of the talent before me. One simply cannot overstate the vocal abilities of Serj Tankian who brought a manic energy and breathtaking vocal range which stretched from thunderous growls to screeching highs and was razor sharp everywhere in between. Song selection leaned heavily into Toxicity but touched on hits from every record including their debut. The true star of the set was lead guitarist Daron Malakian who brought intensity and style to every track. It was an excellent performance from a legendary band.

******** HONORABLE MENTIONS ********

  • Movements
  • Amigo the Devil
  • Parkway Drive
  • Killswitch Engage
  • The Struts
  • Joan Jett and the Blackhearts
  • Gojira
  • Lamb of God

******** HONORABLE MENTIONS ********

1. Foo Fighters

There is perhaps no band in modern rock music quite as renowned for their live performances as the Foo Fighters, and this was further solidified with their set which closed the festival. After extensive rain delays which closed down the stadium for a few hours, Dave Grohl took the stage shouting “You didn’t think we were gonna play, did you?” Which set off a deafening roar from the crowd. The set lasted for two hours, twice as long as any other band on the lineup, and every bit of it was fantastic. From powerful performances of the group’s endless collection of hits to Grohl taking over on drums so that drummer Taylor Hawkins and Luke Spiller of The Struts could cover Queen’s “Under Pressure,” this show was a blast from start to finish. In many ways, a Foo Fighters show feels like a celebration of rock and roll itself, and so naturally, they were the perfect closers for a star-studded weekend which brought some of the best rock music has to offer.

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Defeater’s Self Titled Return is Brutal Yet Heartbreaking

Defeater is a riveting story of struggle which packs a punch of brutal instrumentation and heartfelt lyricism.

Defeater is a melodic hardcore band from Boston. They debuted in 2008 with Travels which tells the story of a young man born in New Jersey near the end of the second world war. This family and the circumstances surrounding them would go on to be the focus of the entirety of Defeater’s discography with each album expanding the world and introducing a litany of new characters, some acting as sequels and others as prequels. In addition to the sprawling narrative, the band’s unique ability to mix hardcore instrumentation with a keen sense of melody makes them one of the most interesting bands in the modern metal scene. They officially parted ways after the 2015 release of Abandoned, but announced in early March that they would return with a self-titled fifth LP.

From the opening track, “The Worst of Fates,” the most prevalent highlight of the band’s sound is clear, that being Derek Archambault’s vocal performance. Throughout the album, especially on cuts like the aforementioned opener or the more subtle “Desperate,” Archambault brings an intensity that can’t be ignored. Under that roughness, however, there’s a genuine vulnerability through which he imbues every story and character with a gruff sort of humanity. It’s a brutal scream, but heartfelt all the same.

Beyond this, Archambault’s lyrics are once again enthralling. Of course, the story telling and conceptualism of the album is every bit as excellent as expected. On tracks like “List & Heel,” or “All Roads,” though, he goes above and beyond in painting vivid imagery and writing with a truly cinematic eye. Along with its many other functions, this album is the fifth installment to a long series which deals with the same family and, in that department, it succeeds wildly.

Instrumentally, the record is a masterwork. Perhaps the most noticeable piece of the puzzle is Joe Longobardi’s drum work. On cuts like “Mother’s Sons,” or “No Guilt,” Joe transitions between complex rhythms and lightning quick fills and does each incredibly well. He has an excellent ear for timing and despite rather predictable time signatures and somewhat weak production, his work shines through as a definitive key to the band’s impressive sound.

Another great element is Jake Woodruff’s grinding lead guitar. While a few of choices are a bit questionable, his contributions to tracks like “Stale Smoke,” and my favorite song on the album, “Debt/Debtor,” can’t be ignored. His drowning style provides a more solid counterpoint against some of the album’s most driving, fast paced beats and he has a talent for writing hooks. On a few cuts, his leads provide the catchiest moments on the album in addition to laying a more layered atmosphere.

My favorite aspect of the band’s sound, though it may not be as immediately noticeable, is founding member Mike Poulin on bass guitar. He grants a heaviness to songs like “Atheists in Foxholes,” and “Hourglass,” and he’s to thank for much of Defeater’s fantastic sound. The chugging, rhythmic bass stands as the foundation of nearly every melody and it is, in many ways, the glue that holds the album together.

As if all this wasn’t enough, Defeater combines all of this for an epic, creative finish in “No Man Born Evil.” This track embodies much of what makes this album so good with a ringing lead guitar, thundering bass, and explosive drums underscoring an unbelievable performance from Derek Archambault which brings to life a harrowing storyline. It’s the perfect ending to a nearly perfect album.

Defeater’s self-titled come back is almost everything fans could’ve hoped for. We get to return to the dark, gritty world which they’ve created over the past decade, guiding by great writing and wonderful performances from the entire band.

Defeater is a riveting story of struggle which packs a punch of brutal instrumentation and heartfelt lyricism.

8/10

Tool Sells Out the Enterprise Center For An Incredible Performance

Tool is still one of the best rock bands in the world, without a doubt, and this tour has only further codified their place in rock history.

Tool is an alt-rock/prog-metal four piece who rose to popularity in the early 1990’s thanks to their unique sound, bizarre live performances, and a fantastic debut EP called Opiate which came out in 1992. At this time, their sound was heavy, often droning, and far more melodic than the majority of the underground metal in the early nineties. As they progressed, and thanks to the additions of Peach bassist Justin Chancellor and King Crimson producer David Bottrill, Tool took on a more experimental and cutting edge tone which led to massive success and critical acclaim which has continued to this day.

I’ve seen Tool three times, and this was by far the best of the bunch. My first experience came in 2016 at the Chaifetz arena in Saint Louis. It was a smaller tour and Chaifetz is a smaller arena, but the show was fantastic and seeing one of my favorite bands for the first time was a blast. The second came as the headliner and final performance at 2018’s Rock on the Range festival where Tool, though not on tour at the time, brought the house down musically but didn’t quite have the stage set up one would expect from the group. Last night, I saw them for the first time in their peak form, in front of a sold out crowd of about 18,000 roaring fans at the Enterprise Center in St. Louis.

Of course, a giant question looms over any review of a Tool concert in 2019, and so I’ll answer it immediately. Yes, they played new music and it was fantastic. Coming into the show, I’d heard a few shoddy cellphone videos of new tracks like “Descending,” and “Invincible,” but I found myself shocked at the extent to which those videos don’t do these songs justice. The former was brutally heavy, featuring a few of the thickest breakdowns in Tool’s catalog and the latter has an interestingly bright tone and some of the best drum work of Danny Carey’s career. As the intermission before the encore came to an end, the screen went blank and lit back up the word’s “August 30th” written in white, referring to the release date for Tool’s first new LP in 13 years, and having heard these new songs in person, I found myself filled with a brand new excitement like I’ve never felt for an album before.

Beyond new music, all four members of the band gave simply incredible performances on a litany of Tool’s best hits over their long career. They opened with “Aenima,” which was a perfectly heavy way to kick off the show. Maynard’s cleaner vocal sounded excellent on tracks like “The Pot,” and his screams were gravelly and powerful. Adam Jones’ guitar work on songs like “Jambi,” was thick and impressively fast-handed.

The stars of the night, however, were certainly the drums and bass. Justin Chancellor’s bass line on “Schism,” was as excellent as ever, and throughout the show, he was an absolute ball of energy, swinging his hips like an ape and playing with a deep, rich tone that seemed to shake the walls of the entire arena.

Just behind him, Danny Carey helmed a massive drum kit and proved once again that he is one of the best drummers of all time. From his complex rhythms on “Forty Six & 2” to his explosive playing on “Vicarious,” and “Intolerance,” his playing commanded respect and attention for the entirety of the show. The encore began with an extended drum and synth solo from Danny, alone on stage, which was an extremely welcome break in the action to appreciate one of the most talented musicians to ever pick up a set of sticks.

Highlights of the show included a sprawling, expansive performance of “Parabol/Parabola,” early in the set and the ferocious performance of “Stinkfist,” to close the show. These were made that much better by an awe-inspiring light show which included an array of lasers, a lighted, colorful pentagram which moved about in the background, and a multitude of entrancing videos on cranes behind the band, most of which consisted of Tool’s infamously strange music videos.

All in all, this was one of the best live performances I’ve ever seen. Nearly 30 years after their debut, to see Tool returning to form in front of a sold out arena is an exhilarating experience. It’s hard to believe that we’re only about three months away from finally hearing the new album and this show left me more excited than ever.

Tool is still one of the best rock bands in the world, without a doubt, and this tour has only further codified their place in rock history.

Architects and Company Bring Rocking Tour to East Saint Louis

Friday night, Architects brought the massive Holy Hell tour to Pop’s in East Saint Louis for a blaring loud night or rock music.

Architects is a metalcore five piece from Brighten, England. They debuted all the way back in 2006 but with their most recent run of albums beginning with 2014’s Lost Forever/Lost Together, they’ve found increasing international success. Their latest LP, Holy Hell released last year at broke the top 100 on the US Billboard chart and spawned a large scale international tour. Their sound mixes the heavier elements of metalcore with fairly melodic choruses, seamlessly transitioning from thundering breakdowns to singable hooks and back again. Friday night, Architects brought the massive Holy Hell tour to Pop’s in East Saint Louis for a blaring loud night or rock music.

While She Sleeps kicked off the show with quite an impressive half-hour set. The relatively accomplished British metalcore group brought an almost unrelenting heaviness to their entire performance and frontman Lawrence Taylor was able to bring the energy within the venue to a fever pitch. All of this was accomplished, notwithstanding quite a few setbacks. Of course, it’s never easy to be the opening act and the crowd was still filtering in at the beginning of the set and beyond this, they were also confined to only about a third of stage thanks to the gear of the following acts. Regardless, While She Sleeps gave quite a performance and set a very high bar.

Up next came Thy Art is Murder, the Australian deathcore band who were quite a bit heavier than either of the other groups sharing the bill. With this reputation already well known, the group absolutely brought the power from their first track. Lead vocalist, Chris McMahon took the stage in a hooded cloak which, along with his long beard and hair and growling voice made for a horrifying, yet entertaining opening. The tracks, admittedly, bled together a bit, but the crowd was electric by this point and thanks to some incredible rhythms from new drummer Jesse Beahler and some fantastic guitar solos from Andy Marsh. Thy Art is Murder played for about an hour and by the time they closed, my ears were ringing and the crowd was more than ready for the headliner.

Architects took the stage at about half past nine to roaring applause and brought even more energy to the stage. Along with the band came an incredible lighting rig which was perfectly programmed. The strobing flood lights and multitude of colors were genuinely mesmerizing and, though I don’t often comment on lighting all that much as its outside my area of expertise, this rig was one of the best I’ve seen in such a small venue.

On top of the staging, the group was extremely impressive musically. Their choruses were melodic and encouraged quite a bit crowd singalongs, and their breakdowns were absolutely brutal. The mix was quite bass heavy throughout all three sets and along with the lighting, this made for a scene that neared sensory overload quite often. Drummer Dan Searle played explosively on a massive kit and frontman Sam Carter’s ability to switch between clean vocals and barbarous screams helps smooth the transitions between their two sounds.

Above all, the highlight of the night was certainly the crowd. For the final two acts, Pop’s was absolutely packed with raucous fans who formed a downright dangerous pit which never seemed to stop growing. Aside from a few stray fights which broke out in the back, the pit was fairly considerate but massive and quite physical.

As the show wrapped up, Sam Carter took a moment to speak candidly about the importance of mental health and reaching out to a professional when dealing with depression and other issues. It was an impressively genuine moment and when it was followed up by an excellent performance of their hit, “Doomsday,” it made for a perfect finish to a great show.

Overall, this was an extremely enjoyable concert with three impressive acts in a row. While She Sleeps was a pleasant surprise as I hand’t heard a single song before their performance, Thy Art is Murder came incredibly close to stealing the show with a brutal set, and Architects showed once again that they are one of the premier groups in the metalcore genre.

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Every System of a Down Album Ranked!!

Here’s my ranking of every album from one of my favorite hard rock bands!

5. System of a Down (1998)

This is most likely not a very controversial opinion as System’s debut record is largely considered their least impressive outing. It’s certainly not without it’s bright points, including some of the group’s most daring cuts to date, but many of the risks don’t pan out in the slightest and we’re left with a record that varies wildly in quality from track to track.

The most recognizable track on this album is, of course, “Spiders,” which is one of SOAD’s earliest hits and still a favorite for longtime fans. The album’s other lead single, “Sugar,” is one of the band’s heaviest works to date and contains some fascinating Eastern influences. The record’s best quality is the heavier, more chaotic style on tracks like “Soil,” and “Suite-Pee,” which make this a necessary listen for any true System fan.

4. Hypnotize (2005)

The last official studio release from SOAD, Hypnotize will always suffer from comparisons to it’s sister album, Mezmerize. In fairness, it’s quite enjoyable. Much of the guitar work is fantastic and Serj’s vocal is as manic and unpredictable as ever. Much of the songwriting is quite strong, but unfortunately, the album just lacks the replay value of other records on the list.

That being said, there’s quite a few fantastic cuts to be found. The title track is incredible and captures Serj’s appreciation for cinematic music well. “Lonely Day,” is one of the group’s best known songs and a surprisingly accessible track for a band with such a bizarre catalog. The folksy guitars on “Dreaming,” are a nice touch and the track as a whole is a nice call back earlier, heavier sound. Overall, it’s an enjoyable listen, but lacks the hits and deep cuts to stand up to earlier releases.

3. Steal This Album! (2002)

Coming quickly on the heals of their 2001 smash hit, Toxicity, System went, in many ways, back to their roots. Steal This Album is equal parts heavy and bizarre and is fairly reminiscent of the debut. However, the experience gained and additional voices allow the bands to make the most of risks which they just couldn’t pull off on the debut. There is a lack of true hits on this record, and it’s not for everyone, but if you want to hear SOAD at their most insane, this is the place.

There are a few tracks that I definitely find myself coming back to regularly. “Mr. Jack,” is a brutal refutation of the police which features some of the best guitar riffs of the entire catalog. The spoken word sections of “Boom!” Are extremely enjoyable, as is the eerie harmony on the chorus. Perhaps my favorite is the pure insanity of “F**k the System,” which is purely bizarre and a testament to the strangest edges of SOAD’s sound.

2. Mezmerize (2005)

One of the more chaotic entries to this list, Mezmerize has quite a bit to love. The riffs and general songwriting are absolutely fantastic and the variety of vocalists, while a bit of a mixed bag here, allows SOAD to reach entirely new places, particularly when it came to rhythmic and style changes, which happen constantly on this album. Unfortunately, Mezmerize suffers from a problem that plagues much of the band’s catalog, that being inconsistency.

That being said, there are more than a few bright spots on this tracklist. “B.Y.O.B.” is yet another incredible piece of protest music with a remarkably dynamic performance from Serj. “Radio/Video,” and “Sad Statue,” are some of the most melodic tracks SOAD has ever recorded. Perhaps the most consistent highlight is the almost comical tone on cuts like “This Cocaine Makes Me Feel Like I’m On This Song,” and “Violent Pornography.” It may not be their strongest effort, but it has some of the brightest points of their career.

1. Toxicity (2001)

The cherry at the very top of a fantastic catalog, Toxicity is one of the best metal/hard rock albums of all time. Rick Rubin’s influence is felt much more on this album, and though I have generally mixed opinions on Rubin’s work, he’s able to strike the perfect balance between brutal chaos and melodic breakdowns. The additional vocals make a big difference and the larger instrumental pallet makes the album feel entirely unpredictable at every moment.

Of course, this album contains “Chop Suey,” which is the band’s biggest hit to date, but “Aerials,” is nearly as well known and, for my money, a much better cut. The heavier pieces on this album include the fantastic, “X,” and the brutal but hilarious “Bounce.” The band also dives headlong into outspoken leftist politics on songs like “Prison Song,” and “Deer Dance.” It’s an absolutely iconic record and one of the few memorable and respectable efforts from the early 2000’s nu-metal boom.

East of the Wall Returns After Five Years With a Strong Prog Rock LP

NP-Complete is a fun listen for fans of progressive rock and metal, though it may turn off some outsiders to the genre.

East of the Wall is a progressive metal outfit from Keyport, New Jersey. They debuted with a self-titled EP in 2006, which kicked off a fairly impressive career and expansive catalog. However, after their fourth full length LP in 2013, they seemed to fall off the map a bit, only releasing one EP in 2015 under Epistemic Records instead of their usual partners, Translation Loss Records. After a long hiatus and more than a few notable lineup changes, they’ve finally returned with their first full scale release in almost six years, NP-Complete.

Much of what works so well about this album is what one would expect from a prog metal band of this caliber, but there are a few surprises, namely in the production. The stereo imaging on this album is absolutely wonderful, and really demands a nice set of headphones. Take a track like the opener, “Tell Them I’m Sorry,” for example. The production work doesn’t quite jump out, but closer examination shows that not only is every instrument, especially the drums, extremely well mixed, but every sound has a direction allowing this album to really surround a listener. 

Another strength which is all too often ignored in the metal world is the excellent bass guitar work. From cuts like the hilariously named “Fast-Bang Pooper Doop,” to the later “Somn 6,” the bass is not only extremely well played, leaving the guitars side for some inspired melodic lines, but it’s also able to cut through the rather chaotic mixes and shine quite effectively. It’s often missing from even the best metal records, and so a strong bass presence is a welcome feeling on NP-Complete.

Of course, the staples of great progressive rock are still here. A multitude of electric guitars form the melodic front to nearly every track, even verging on some shoe-gaze inspirations at a few points. “Leinholder,” is an excellent example of the pure proficiency with which these guitars are played by nearly every member of the band and the track dances through strange signatures and quick riffs with ease. The closer and best track, “Non-Functional Harmony,” on the other hand, is more sparsely populated with a driving and well written riff.

However, while the guitars may be the muscles of this project, Seth Rheam on drums is definitely the backbone. Nearly every song incorporates complex rhythms, strange signatures, and remarkably fast fills, all of which Rheam does with relative ease. “Clapping on the Ones and Threes,” is a nice shining moment for the drums as Seth strikes a great balance between tight, sharp fills and explosive cymbal shots. “N of 1,” on the other hand kicks off with a fantastic drum solo which carries over into one of the best, most rhythmic cuts on the album.

All this being said, I do have a few loud gripes with the album. First and foremost, the vocals leave quite a bit to be desired. While there are a few nice moments like the brutal screams on “Somn 6,” but the majority of the album is packed full of incredible instrumental work and sub par vocals.

Additionally, the instrumental and overall sound pallet are a bit clean and safe for my taste. Nearly every guitar sounds almost pristine, and the majority of vocals are clean as well. When they do attempt to add other instruments, be they synths or a saxophone on the closer, it feels mostly out of step with the direction of the track. I can’t help but wish for a more daring, and perhaps more abrasive pallet.

Worst of all, though, the pacing varies widely, but leans on the side of slow and dense. This, of course, may not be an issue for the hardline prog-metal fan, and I myself can forgive some of it, but a track like “The Almost People,” illustrates this quite well as it just becomes lost in itself over the near eight minute runtime, with no discernible sectioning or direction.

Overall, I enjoyed NP-Complete. It can be a bit of a slog at times, and the lack of risks does catch up with the band at times, but for fans of long-form, jazz-influenced, technically challenging music, this is a treat.

NP-Complete is a fun listen for fans of progressive rock and metal, though it may turn off some outsiders to the genre.

6/10

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The George Washing Machines Drop Brutal and Daring EP

Overall, FUNERAL CRACK BINGE is one of the more daring and brutal projects I’ve heard this year, and while it’s certainly not for everyone, it’s a must hear if who wish to explore the fringes of underground music.
**TW: Bad Language**

The George Washing Machines is the experiment grindcore/doom metal alter ego of Jack Simpson. Created in 2012 in Washington, D.C., with the explicit goal of creating “the worst band of all time,” the outfit dropped a large collection of about 22 singles before falling off the map as Simpson shifted toward EDM music. Six years later, after the death of a close personal friend, Jack reignited GWM as an outlet to deal with depression while dabbling in experimental writing styles like taking quotes from a former crack addict or directly reciting a breakup letter written to an ex-girlfriend. Now much more mature and with a wide array of fascinating influences, the George Washing Machines has dropped FUNERAL CRACK BINGE.

The record opens with the hilariously titled “ANTHONY FANTANO WOULD PROBABLY GIVE THIS RECORD LIKE A 6.3,” which, itself, begins with a long and angry statement claiming that this is “not music.” The track that follows is a hellish, doom metal-inspired cut that is one of the better openers I’ve heard all year. This is the first of many points on the EP in which the drumming is excellent, but the brutally distorted guitars are actually the highlight for me here, aided by the periodically disorienting feedbacks.

It’s followed by “BITCH GET THE FUCK OUT OF MY HOUSE,” which is a real freight train of a song. There’s a much heavier thrash and grindcore element as the fuzzy guitars chug along at a much faster tempo and the drums are driving and explosive. The vocals are quite impressive here, despite having no lyrics aside from repeating the title, bringing a gravelly quality that really adds to the track. The highlight, without a doubt, is the bizarre and abrasive breakdown that leads into the final chorus. While the electronic elements are fairly scarce across the EP, they add quite a bit to this song.

The best of the six tracks, “A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND,” comes next, and it’s here where Simpson finds a sound that this fairly unique to him. With heavy influences from post-punk and hardcore, this track turns out to be certainly the most accessible on the project, though that isn’t saying much. The drums are excellent on this cut, as are the vocals, and the balance struck between crushing instrumentation and singable melody is truly something to be proud of.

We seem to take a left turn to hell immediately after, however, with the title track, “FUNERAL CRACK BINGE.” This is one of the more brutal and caustic songs I’ve heard in quite some time, from the screeching loops to the pummeling screams and the almost reptilian effects of the outro. It’s a lush hellscape that should satisfy fans of the group’s earlier sound.

The post-punk returns, however, on “ANNA, PLEASE DON’T MOVE TO PORTLAND WITH JAKE.” The quick switches from heavy but accessible verses to genuinely horrifying choruses are jarring in the best way possible. There’s a desperation conveyed very well in the lead vocals and the guitars are gut wrenching on the choruses. Once again, the drums shine as being extremely well played and arranged, and it makes for yet another fantastic track.

We close out with “I MEAN I GUESS WE CAN FUCK IF YOU WANT TO…” and it’s here where I will find my first substantive complaint as the more electronic, industrial style of this track makes it feel quite out of place in the lineup. That being said, it is a great song. The loops are extremely well utilized, the rapping from Young Socrates is phenomenal and jam packed with emotional delivery, and the ending may be the best on the record. Though it does feel a bit out of place here, it does give hope that future releases could tend toward more electronic, Death Grips inspired tone.

While my complaints are minor, I do have a few, most of them stemming from the production side. First and foremost, the drums. While they’re perfectly performed, they seem to have been left almost bare in terms of EQ and could do with a bit of touching up. Additionally, the there is a pervasive static across the record, which likely comes from the several higher pitched cymbals and the near constant overdrive on guitars and vocals. Having a constant amount of noise is, of course, not a bad thing on a noise rock record, but much of this seems to come from nowhere, and could likely be fixed with a bit tighter EQ on the instruments. All of this, however, is fairly forgivable, considering the EP’s DIY style.

Overall, FUNERAL CRACK BINGE is one of the more daring and brutal projects I’ve heard this year, and while it’s certainly not for everyone, it’s a must hear if who wish to explore the fringes of underground music.

4/5